College student, bad professor

Thread Starter

curban1590

Joined Feb 9, 2016
6
https://courseware.ee.calpoly.edu/~jzhang/EE112/Fall03/exam1.pdf
my problem is the same thing as question 1 on this sheet, the problem is my professor does not actually teach anything. He assumes we all know everything already and does no examples on the work he does which is my first class related to electrical engineering. I haven't seen any examples of questions and thus i had no idea what to do when he assigned this. Thank you for your help.
 

Thread Starter

curban1590

Joined Feb 9, 2016
6
Do you know any first principles from which you can formulate an approach to the problem?
Ohms law, I=Q/t (I=Amperes,Q=Coulombs,t=time), V=W/Q (V=volts,W=joules,Q=coulombs) and thats pretty much it. I just do not know how to approach the problem.
 

joeyd999

Joined Jun 6, 2011
4,291
I=Q/t will help you with the second part.

You'll also need Joule's Law to help you with the first (unless you want to deal with transforming i,t, and R into V's and Q's!)

From there on, it's just calculus. Does that help?

FYI, the second part can be deduced by inspection...can you think of why?
 

Thread Starter

curban1590

Joined Feb 9, 2016
6
I=Q/t will help you with the second part.

You'll also need Joule's Law to help you with the first (unless you want to deal with transforming i,t, and R into V's and Q's!)

From there on, it's just calculus. Does that help?

FYI, the second part can be deduced by inspection...can you think of why?
Is it because it starts at 0 and ends at 0? Or because the total positive charge is equal to the total negative charge and they both cancel out? I'm sorry I have been teaching myself up to this point and i want to enjoy electrical engineering but i cant if i dont understand.
 

joeyd999

Joined Jun 6, 2011
4,291
Is it because it starts at 0 and ends at 0? Or because the total positive charge is equal to the total negative charge and they both cancel out?
One of these answers is correct, but it will be better for you to determine which. I told you the equations you need -- you just need to integrate through time.
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
25,068
https://courseware.ee.calpoly.edu/~jzhang/EE112/Fall03/exam1.pdf
my problem is the same thing as question 1 on this sheet, the problem is my professor does not actually teach anything. He assumes we all know everything already and does no examples on the work he does which is my first class related to electrical engineering. I haven't seen any examples of questions and thus i had no idea what to do when he assigned this. Thank you for your help.
And you don't have a text?

Most Circuits I courses have some kind of prereq such as Physics II (Intro to Electricity and Magnetism), but that's not universal. They almost all have a couple semesters of Calculus as prereqs. These are all problems that someone with those prereqs should be able to do on the first day of class, so the instructor may just be assuming that students paid attention during the prereq courses.
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
25,068
Ohms law, I=Q/t (I=Amperes,Q=Coulombs,t=time), V=W/Q (V=volts,W=joules,Q=coulombs) and thats pretty much it. I just do not know how to approach the problem.
You should have been introduced (or at least it should be very easy to find in the early part of your text) that

\(
i(t) \; = \; \frac{dq(t)}{dt}
\)

If you integrate both sides, you get

\(
q(t) \; = \; \int \, i(t) \, dt
\)

You should be able to make a similar integral equations for the total energy by noting that power is the time-rate-change of energy and also that power is voltage times current. You know the current and you know the voltage via Ohm's Law.

So, take everything that you've been told, and show your best effort to solve the problem.
 

Thread Starter

curban1590

Joined Feb 9, 2016
6
And you don't have a text?

Most Circuits I courses have some kind of prereq such as Physics II (Intro to Electricity and Magnetism), but that's not universal. They almost all have a couple semesters of Calculus as prereqs. These are all problems that someone with those prereqs should be able to do on the first day of class, so the instructor may just be assuming that students paid attention during the prereq courses.
There is a co requisite of pre calculus and that is it, but i have taken up to calc 2, i have not taken ANY physics yet and i definitely would have waited if I knew it would have helped me, but there was no way i could have known and if i drop now i lose all financial aid so im in a bind here. the text is:
INTRODUCTORY CIRCUIT ANALYSIS
By BOYLESTAD
but looking at it when he did not explain what section this would be in or anything has left me clueless.
 

hp1729

Joined Nov 23, 2015
2,304
https://courseware.ee.calpoly.edu/~jzhang/EE112/Fall03/exam1.pdf
my problem is the same thing as question 1 on this sheet, the problem is my professor does not actually teach anything. He assumes we all know everything already and does no examples on the work he does which is my first class related to electrical engineering. I haven't seen any examples of questions and thus i had no idea what to do when he assigned this. Thank you for your help.
It looks like the handout needs to be supported by classroom stuff.
 

#12

Joined Nov 30, 2010
18,170
The total rate of change of the graph is 0, which should be regarding the charge transferred in the second part right?
b) (The second part.) How much total charge is transferred in the same period of time?

Zero charge transferred? Do you mean all sine waves have no energy, so you can stick your finger in a light socket?
What is the point of this exercise of all the answers are zero?
What are the units of energy in this case?
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
25,068
The total rate of change of the graph is 0, which should be reguarding the charge transferred in the second part right?
The total "rate" of change?

Or the total change?

There's a difference.

The second part of the question has a couple of reasonable interpretations. Show your work and explain your result and you should be okay regardless of which interpretation you choose.
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
25,068
b) (The second part.) How much total charge is transferred in the same period of time?

Zero charge transferred? Do you mean all sine waves have no energy, so you can stick your finger in a light socket?
What is the point of this exercise of all the answers are zero?
What are the units of energy in this case?
Zero charge transferred does not equate to zero energy transferred.
 

#12

Joined Nov 30, 2010
18,170
Zero charge transferred does not equate to zero energy transferred.
Oh. In that case, all the answers are zero.
My bad.

When a milliamp flows through a 5K resistor, and then you reverse the polarity and the current goes the other way for the same amount of time, no charge is transferred. Got it.
 
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