Burned out SMD resistor in slushy machine

Thread Starter

patrickbryanbedard

Joined Mar 4, 2022
14
Hi Everyone,

I am a complete amateur, have been working as a Electrician on ships for a few years. Slowly but surely learning electronics. Anyhow I'm writing to ask for advice on a broken slushy machine. I found the resistor on the control board is burned up, I can no longer read the value to replace and don't have a diagram. There's a capacitor next to the resistor, the output of this part of the circuit drives the refrigerant compressor. Is this what they call a bleed off circuit?
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
17,134
Welcome to AAC!
It's Vevor slushy machine I don't have a manual haven't seen the name plate data.
If it's R1D, what makes you think it's bad? It looks like a 0 ohm resistor which shouldn't be able to dissipate enough power to cause it to open circuit. Have you measured it's resistance?
 

Irving

Joined Jan 30, 2016
4,054
It is a zero ohm resistor and they are commonly used as fusible links. I have a processer card from a washing machine where a wire carrying 240v came loose and touched another connector - the result is an exploded resistor. However that doesn't look so burnt to me - is it open circuit or not?
 

Thread Starter

patrickbryanbedard

Joined Mar 4, 2022
14
Welcome to AAC!
If it's R1D, what makes you think it's bad? It looks like a 0 ohm resistor which shouldn't be able to dissipate enough power to cause it to open circuit. Have you measured it's resistance?
I did measure, it was in Mohms. Now that you're mentioning it, maybe it's not. It just kind of looked bad and the back of the board had some dis-coloration. Also the Compressor is not coming on..?
 

Irving

Joined Jan 30, 2016
4,054
If its burnt out and its the feed to the compressor then there's a reason its failed.... before replacing it you need to do some checking...
 

Thread Starter

patrickbryanbedard

Joined Mar 4, 2022
14
If its burnt out and its the feed to the compressor then there's a reason its failed.... before replacing it you need to do some checking...
Totally agree, so a little more background: The machine was meant to be ran on 50hz(the ship makes 460v 220 per leg 60hz) so my co-workers hooked it up to a VFD. The VFD kept tripping because the it wasn't powerful enough to run everything. So they have it wired where the output pins of control board close a contactor which powers the compressor directly from the wall outlet. It seems a little questionable to me....hence this forum. Any help would be appreciated ☺
 

Dodgydave

Joined Jun 22, 2012
11,356
That looks like a series resistor and capacitor they probably are a suppression pair, is there any voltage on the compressor terminals?
 

Irving

Joined Jan 30, 2016
4,054
Totally agree, so a little more background: The machine was meant to be ran on 50hz(the ship makes 460v 220 per leg 60hz) so my co-workers hooked it up to a VFD. The VFD kept tripping because the it wasn't powerful enough to run everything. So they have it wired where the output pins of control board close a contactor which powers the compressor directly from the wall outlet. It seems a little questionable to me....hence this forum. Any help would be appreciated ☺
Logically that should work - a contactor should be less of a load than the compressor. Surely such a machine would run well enough on 60Hz?
 

Thread Starter

patrickbryanbedard

Joined Mar 4, 2022
14
Logically that should work - a contactor should be less of a load than the compressor. Surely such a machine would run well enough on 60Hz?

I think the worry was if the entire machine was ran on 60hz the augers/turbines etc... would spin too fast. They might have tried that originally, I wasn't around when it was installed. Just trying to make it work again per order of the Chief Engineer.
 
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