Breaker switch not outputting voltage

Thread Starter

alchemizt

Joined Mar 23, 2021
24
So I setup the electricity in my cabin in the jungle, I have access to 220V from the community. I connected it to a circuit breaker switch at the front of my house, I had electricity in my house when I left it, but I went travelling for 6 months, other people used my house in that time, now that Ive come back the electricity doesnt work. Its definitely the breaker switch.

My multimeter reads about 200V AC when I touch the top screws only when the breaker is OFF, when I turn the breaker on, it reads 1 or 2 volts, which is what it outputs too. Look at the pictures I attached.

The bottom screws read 2V also, so the breaker is not working properly. Does this mean I need to get a new breaker switch, or can I fix it? Why would it break like that after only 6 months?
 

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Externet

Joined Nov 29, 2005
1,816
A tree fell on the supply line from the community. Time for an inspection walk, voltmeter in hand to check the source too.
 

Thread Starter

alchemizt

Joined Mar 23, 2021
24
EDIT:

So I've figured out its not actually the curcuit breaker, the breaker switch works when I disconnect the wire for the first floor of my house. So its something wrong with my wiring on the first floor. You see how in the picture I have green and blue wires. Its the green circuit thats the issue. It has 3 electrical outlets and three lights + switches attached to it.

Im not sure how to diagnose and fix this
 
Last edited:

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
4,738
Sounds to me like you have a short. With the breaker out, measure the resistance across the wires out if the breaker.

Bob
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
24,975
Something does not look right with the wiring of that breaker, can you show how it is wired? Circuit diagram?
Have you set up a local earth GND point also?
Also power supply in is normally at the top with the circuit fed out from the bottom.
 

Thread Starter

alchemizt

Joined Mar 23, 2021
24
Sounds to me like you have a short. With the breaker out, measure the resistance across the wires out if the breaker.

Bob
YESSS!! I went around inspecting every wire and found it. Someone had removed electrical wire and two exposed parts of wire were touching. So it was a short causing that was behind all this, not the breaker
 

scorbin1

Joined Dec 24, 2019
103
I'm concerned that the top two screws showed almost no voltage after the breaker was closed. Either it's dead shorting(not likely or you would probably see fireworks or the breaker should blow) or there is an issue with the supply line. I think the only explanation is that either the supply is somehow current limited or you have a weak connection somewhere. If the voltage is that low at the breaker, the weak connection is likely in the supply line somewhere
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
14,303
Two sections of spliced wire had no electrical tape and were touching, so this created a "dead short".
You're lucky it was a dead short and not some contact that could generate heat or sparks and burn your cabin down. Heat shrink or silicon tape would be better than electrical tape in a humid climate.

I'd get some wire nuts and boxes to contain the splices. Do you have an earth ground or a ground fault interrupter? A GFCI will still protect from shock/electrocution if you don't have an earth ground.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
24,975
Do you have an earth ground or a ground fault interrupter? A GFCI will still protect from shock/electrocution if you don't have an earth ground.
As per post #9, a earth ground conductor has to be implemented, even for a GFCI/RCD.
Assuming the service supply is referenced to earth ground.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
24,975
A GFCI can still protect against shock without earth ground. In the US, it would need to be labeled if it didn't have earth ground.
How does it work if not connected to ground, this also is the reason for the test trip button, in order to confirm a ground path?
GF = Ground fault.
In any case, a ground path has to be provided somewhere in the system.
 

sghioto

Joined Dec 31, 2017
3,058
It was checking the splices that I found the issue. Two sections of spliced wire had no electrical tape and were touching, so this created a "dead short".
If that was the case then the breaker should have tripped. Are using an actual circuit breaker or is it just a switch.
 
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