Bluetooth - Phone click communication

Thread Starter

בר אזולאי

Joined Apr 30, 2017
5
Excuse me for being utterly clueless, but as I have no idea even what to look for, I struggle to find any answers.
Here's the thing: I had an idea that requires having several clickers/buttons (something you tap, as small as possible)
that communicate with the phone via bluetooth.
The only information that needs to be transformed is which one was clicked.
How can it be done?
 

#12

Joined Nov 30, 2010
18,076
The error in the thought process seems to be that you can use two identical buttons and somebody or some thing can tell the difference on the other end. Each button must have some characteristic different from the other, and that difference that can be detected by a circuit. The obvious method (to me) is to have each button send a different tone frequency, but your description is not enough to tell if that would suit your needs.
 

Thread Starter

בר אזולאי

Joined Apr 30, 2017
5
The error in the thought process seems to be that you can use two identical buttons and somebody or some thing can tell the difference on the other end. Each button must have some characteristic different from the other, and that difference that can be detected by a circuit. The obvious method (to me) is to have each button send a different tone frequency, but your description is not enough to tell if that would suit your needs.
Different tone frequencies sounds adequate.
To clear things up: let's say I have five buttons (the buttons should not be phisically connected to any other component).
When I press the first I want my phone to show "1", to show "2" when I press the second, etc.
What components do I need for the buttons and for the communication system (I'm guessing each button would have to transmit to a central component which would pass which button was pressed to the phone).
I have no prior experience, so I need as simpified as possible explanation on the implementation.
Thanks!
 

Thread Starter

בר אזולאי

Joined Apr 30, 2017
5
BLE. A Microchip RN4020 can be scripted to do this without an additional microcontroller or programming.
I think it might be excessively advanced (and thereforeexpensive) for my needs.
As I understand it, the microchip is the component that communicates with the phone (right?).
doed this mean I need one for all the buttons or one for each button?
Is there a simpler (and cheaper) microchip more suitable for my needs (just passin which button's pressed,
I'd rather do all the programming inside an app on the device.
 

joeyd999

Joined Jun 6, 2011
4,239
I think it might be excessively advanced (and thereforeexpensive) for my needs.
Then, as usual, I am wasting my time with a "first time caller". Your "needs" should be expressed in your first post, in order that we can tailor the perfect solution for you at no charge.

Besides, $8 is generally not excessive for a hobbiest project -- if that's what it is. But I have no way of knowing that.

As I understand it, the microchip is the component that communicates with the phone (right?).
The RN4020 is a Bluetooth LE radio. You would have known that if you followed the link I took the time to give you.

does this mean I need one for all the buttons or one for each button?
I suppose you wish me to read the documentation for you??? No, there are multiple I/O that can be incorporated into a script to cause transmission of data to the phone.

Is there a simpler (and cheaper) microchip more suitable for my needs (just passin which button's pressed, I'd rather do all the programming inside an app on the device.
For me, no. For you, who knows.
 

Rony Peretz

Joined May 1, 2017
1
Then, as usual, I am wasting my time with a "first time caller". Your "needs" should be expressed in your first post, in order that we can tailor the perfect solution for you at no charge.

Besides, $8 is generally not excessive for a hobbiest project -- if that's what it is. But I have no way of knowing that.



The RN4020 is a Bluetooth LE radio. You would have known that if you followed the link I took the time to give you.



I suppose you wish me to read the documentation for you??? No, there are multiple I/O that can be incorporated into a script to cause transmission of data to the phone.



For me, no. For you, who knows.
You can use arduino uno with blutooth and clickers and than programming it every button will send different data to the app
 

Thread Starter

בר אזולאי

Joined Apr 30, 2017
5
Then, as usual, I am wasting my time with a "first time caller". Your "needs" should be expressed in your first post, in order that we can tailor the perfect solution for you at no charge.

Besides, $8 is generally not excessive for a hobbiest project -- if that's what it is. But I have no way of knowing that.



The RN4020 is a Bluetooth LE radio. You would have known that if you followed the link I took the time to give you.



I suppose you wish me to read the documentation for you??? No, there are multiple I/O that can be incorporated into a script to cause transmission of data to the phone.



For me, no. For you, who knows.
My sincere appology if I have wasted your time. I expressed my needs to the best of my ability.
Clicking buttons and being notified on the phone when a button was click. the simplest way to do that.
I did follow the link you attached, and read the entire document. Being a first timer, can't say I understood it completely.
I am not familiar with a lot of the terms, and couldn't quite find the answers by myself.
Either way, I appreciate the time you spent answering me, even if you feel it was wasted.
 

Raymond Genovese

Joined Mar 5, 2016
1,661
My sincere appology if I have wasted your time. I expressed my needs to the best of my ability.
Clicking buttons and being notified on the phone when a button was click. the simplest way to do that.
I did follow the link you attached, and read the entire document. Being a first timer, can't say I understood it completely.
I am not familiar with a lot of the terms, and couldn't quite find the answers by myself.
Either way, I appreciate the time you spent answering me, even if you feel it was wasted.
It can be frustrating for both sides, but consider that when you say that you are "utterly clueless", that also might mean that you are going to have a hard time understanding a recommended solution.

@joeyd999 is, in fact, correct that what he suggested is, at least in my view, a reasonable approach to accomplish what you want to do.

Your response, "Is there a simpler (and cheaper) microchip more suitable for my needs (just passin which button's pressed, I'd rather do all the programming inside an app on the device." is very revealing. Remember, just because you want it to be simple, doesn't make it simple. Learning how to do it does. Your response to a suggested solution was a little off-putting because it was basically, "that's no good, I want something simple that I can do".

1. You want a device with switches. 2. You want to read the state of the switches and transmit the state of the switches via Bluetooth. 3. You want to read the transmitted state of the switches using an 'app' on your phone. If you consider all that is involved in doing this, you will start learning.

1. Well that is pretty easy, but that may be the only part that is easy for you to understand right now.

2. Bluetooth is a radio transmission according to a protocol. You will need a chip that has this kind of radio. That radio is going to have to include some level of compatibility with your phone. Not too hard, but impossibly complicated if you are, in fact, utterly clueless. You will need to know how to read the state of the switches and transmit that state to your phone.

There are different ways of doing this. Typically, something like this switch setup would be called a peripheral, as far as your phone is concerned. But your device has to be transmitting information to tell your phone that it exists and that it will allow your phone to connect to it. After establishing a connection, your peripheral can be set up to send a transmission every time that the state of the switches changes - that is typical for a Bluetooth device.

You could even set up a Bluetooth beacon that is transmitting the state of the switches to anything, including your phone, that knows how to listen.

3. Programming your phone to connect to your peripheral is not trivial. The phone needs to find the your device, connect to it, and stay connected to receive any 'updates' that your device is transmitting Then it has to do something that you want according to the information it received.There are lots of applications that can help you do that, but if you want to do something custom - something very particular, you will likely need to do some programming yourself. So, that is a big deal, if you are "utterly clueless".

I just don't see how you get to the point where you can do what you want to do without learning some fundamentals. Unless, of course, you can find something that is already available - and there might be such a device.

Still want to turn your idea into a reality?

Look into an Arduino 101 microcomputer board for example. It has a BLE radio on board and can be programmed using a beginner-friendly language that lots of people already use. Look into Android (or IS) programming for your phone side. Spend a good deal of time learning about these topics and gain some experience. If you already have some experience with some of this (like writing phone apps) then great, you are that much closer.

The further along that you get, the more specific your questions will become and folks here will try to help. Right now, however, it sounds like you have a fair amount to learn before you can start asking some of those questions or even understand the answers. You have some foundations to build, just like everyone. Make sense?
 

joeyd999

Joined Jun 6, 2011
4,239
It can be frustrating for both sides, but consider that when you say that you are "utterly clueless", that also might mean that you are going to have a hard time understanding a recommended solution.

@joeyd999 is, in fact, correct that what he suggested is, at least in my view, a reasonable approach to accomplish what you want to do.

Your response, "Is there a simpler (and cheaper) microchip more suitable for my needs (just passin which button's pressed, I'd rather do all the programming inside an app on the device." is very revealing. Remember, just because you want it to be simple, doesn't make it simple. Learning how to do it does. Your response to a suggested solution was a little off-putting because it was basically, "that's no good, I want something simple that I can do".

1. You want a device with switches. 2. You want to read the state of the switches and transmit the state of the switches via Bluetooth. 3. You want to read the transmitted state of the switches using an 'app' on your phone. If you consider all that is involved in doing this, you will start learning.

1. Well that is pretty easy, but that may be the only part that is easy for you to understand right now.

2. Bluetooth is a radio transmission according to a protocol. You will need a chip that has this kind of radio. That radio is going to have to include some level of compatibility with your phone. Not too hard, but impossibly complicated if you are, in fact, utterly clueless. You will need to know how to read the state of the switches and transmit that state to your phone.

There are different ways of doing this. Typically, something like this switch setup would be called a peripheral, as far as your phone is concerned. But your device has to be transmitting information to tell your phone that it exists and that it will allow your phone to connect to it. After establishing a connection, your peripheral can be set up to send a transmission every time that the state of the switches changes - that is typical for a Bluetooth device.

You could even set up a Bluetooth beacon that is transmitting the state of the switches to anything, including your phone, that knows how to listen.

3. Programming your phone to connect to your peripheral is not trivial. The phone needs to find the your device, connect to it, and stay connected to receive any 'updates' that your device is transmitting Then it has to do something that you want according to the information it received.There are lots of applications that can help you do that, but if you want to do something custom - something very particular, you will likely need to do some programming yourself. So, that is a big deal, if you are "utterly clueless".

I just don't see how you get to the point where you can do what you want to do without learning some fundamentals. Unless, of course, you can find something that is already available - and there might be such a device.

Still want to turn your idea into a reality?

Look into an Arduino 101 microcomputer board for example. It has a BLE radio on board and can be programmed using a beginner-friendly language that lots of people already use. Look into Android (or IS) programming for your phone side. Spend a good deal of time learning about these topics and gain some experience. If you already have some experience with some of this (like writing phone apps) then great, you are that much closer.

The further along that you get, the more specific your questions will become and folks here will try to help. Right now, however, it sounds like you have a fair amount to learn before you can start asking some of those questions or even understand the answers. You have some foundations to build, just like everyone. Make sense?
You have far more patience than I do.
 

Thread Starter

בר אזולאי

Joined Apr 30, 2017
5
It can be frustrating for both sides, but consider that when you say that you are "utterly clueless", that also might mean that you are going to have a hard time understanding a recommended solution.

@joeyd999 is, in fact, correct that what he suggested is, at least in my view, a reasonable approach to accomplish what you want to do.

Your response, "Is there a simpler (and cheaper) microchip more suitable for my needs (just passin which button's pressed, I'd rather do all the programming inside an app on the device." is very revealing. Remember, just because you want it to be simple, doesn't make it simple. Learning how to do it does. Your response to a suggested solution was a little off-putting because it was basically, "that's no good, I want something simple that I can do".

1. You want a device with switches. 2. You want to read the state of the switches and transmit the state of the switches via Bluetooth. 3. You want to read the transmitted state of the switches using an 'app' on your phone. If you consider all that is involved in doing this, you will start learning.

1. Well that is pretty easy, but that may be the only part that is easy for you to understand right now.

2. Bluetooth is a radio transmission according to a protocol. You will need a chip that has this kind of radio. That radio is going to have to include some level of compatibility with your phone. Not too hard, but impossibly complicated if you are, in fact, utterly clueless. You will need to know how to read the state of the switches and transmit that state to your phone.

There are different ways of doing this. Typically, something like this switch setup would be called a peripheral, as far as your phone is concerned. But your device has to be transmitting information to tell your phone that it exists and that it will allow your phone to connect to it. After establishing a connection, your peripheral can be set up to send a transmission every time that the state of the switches changes - that is typical for a Bluetooth device.

You could even set up a Bluetooth beacon that is transmitting the state of the switches to anything, including your phone, that knows how to listen.

3. Programming your phone to connect to your peripheral is not trivial. The phone needs to find the your device, connect to it, and stay connected to receive any 'updates' that your device is transmitting Then it has to do something that you want according to the information it received.There are lots of applications that can help you do that, but if you want to do something custom - something very particular, you will likely need to do some programming yourself. So, that is a big deal, if you are "utterly clueless".

I just don't see how you get to the point where you can do what you want to do without learning some fundamentals. Unless, of course, you can find something that is already available - and there might be such a device.

Still want to turn your idea into a reality?

Look into an Arduino 101 microcomputer board for example. It has a BLE radio on board and can be programmed using a beginner-friendly language that lots of people already use. Look into Android (or IS) programming for your phone side. Spend a good deal of time learning about these topics and gain some experience. If you already have some experience with some of this (like writing phone apps) then great, you are that much closer.

The further along that you get, the more specific your questions will become and folks here will try to help. Right now, however, it sounds like you have a fair amount to learn before you can start asking some of those questions or even understand the answers. You have some foundations to build, just like everyone. Make sense?
Couldn't thank you enough. Really.
I guess I understimated the complexity of the matter.
I do have experience in android programming , so that's the part I'm least worried about.
On the rest of it, I definetely have a lot to learn.
Was looking for directions to where to look for answers, and youv'e given me more than enough.
Thanks again!
 

#12

Joined Nov 30, 2010
18,076
My sincere apology if I have wasted your time.
A person gives a one sentence answer then posts three more times be sure you know his emotional condition. Does that reveal that the primary goal was to help the Thread Starter?

I backed out because more qualified help was arriving quickly. I wasted my time, too. So what?
Do I have a right to expect that every post I make is going to connect well with the needs and skills of the Thread Starter?
Who wasted the most time and who made him do it?
This site provides and "ignore" option which is accessed by a left click on the name under the avatar.
 
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