Battery powered Arduino resets when bumped

Thread Starter

Griffin5335

Joined Sep 12, 2018
6
I am building a prototype that uses 100 ws2812b LEDs controlled by an Arduino Nano. The circuit is powered by an 18650 battery, I believe the power is getting interrupted when the device is bumped or dropped causing the Arduino to reset and the program to restart. I think this is happening either due to the spring in the battery holder deflecting slightly when bumped causing a momentary disconnect or the switch on the device is sensitive causing a power interruption. I tried adding a capacitor to help supply power temporarily durring these quick interruptions but that didnt seem to work. Any suggestions are appreciated.
 

gramps

Joined Dec 8, 2014
86
I'll assume that by "a capacitor", you mean an electrolytic capacitor of maybe 470+ mfd.
Check your Nano for cracks on the board, loose wiring, bad solder joints, etc.
Substitute a different Nano to see if the issue is resolved.


Is your design still on a breadboard?
 

KeithWalker

Joined Jul 10, 2017
3,135
I am building a prototype that uses 100 ws2812b LEDs controlled by an Arduino Nano. The circuit is powered by an 18650 battery, I believe the power is getting interrupted when the device is bumped or dropped causing the Arduino to reset and the program to restart. I think this is happening either due to the spring in the battery holder deflecting slightly when bumped causing a momentary disconnect or the switch on the device is sensitive causing a power interruption. I tried adding a capacitor to help supply power temporarily durring these quick interruptions but that didnt seem to work. Any suggestions are appreciated.
Solder the battery connections in place.
 

Thread Starter

Griffin5335

Joined Sep 12, 2018
6
Thanks for the reply, yes i did use an electrolytic capacitor of 470 mfd. Was as that a reasonable idea? I have the capacitor wired in parallel with the circuit just like i would a battery, should it instead be wired inline in series on the + lead? No i have a fairly presentable functional prototype, not on breadboard, it just resets when you smack it hard or graze the power switch.



I'll assume that by "a capacitor", you mean an electrolytic capacitor of maybe 470+ mfd.
Check your Nano for cracks on the board, loose wiring, bad solder joints, etc.
Substitute a different Nano to see if the issue is resolved.


Is your design still on a breadboard?
 

Thread Starter

Griffin5335

Joined Sep 12, 2018
6
Haha, well im not abusing it too hard and it is in a secure housing. But this thing is a toy and its prone to be dropped or endure a couple bumps. Nothing too crazy. I misspoke when i said it has 100 leds, im working on multiple projects. This one only uses 36 LEDs. Why didnt my capacitor idea work? I would have thought this would supply power for a short time after power is cut off.

Try a more robust power switch. And stop mistreating your poor Nano by thumping/dropping it :).
 

AlbertHall

Joined Jun 4, 2014
12,384
Haha, well im not abusing it too hard and it is in a secure housing. But this thing is a toy and its prone to be dropped or endure a couple bumps. Nothing too crazy. I misspoke when i said it has 100 leds, im working on multiple projects. This one only uses 36 LEDs. Why didnt my capacitor idea work? I would have thought this would supply power for a short time after power is cut off.
Was the capacitor connected before or after the switch?
If the problem is the switch then to be of any help the capacitor must be connected after the switch.
 

Thread Starter

Griffin5335

Joined Sep 12, 2018
6
The switch is between the capacitor and the battery. I was trying to share an image but im having trouble hosting an image to get a url from my phone. But yeah the capacitor is after the switch. Im gonna try a bigger capacitor tonight maybe.




Was the capacitor connected before or after the switch?
If the problem is the switch then to be of any help the capacitor must be connected after the switch.
 
If you assume that the problem is a brief disconnection of power caused by a bump (which is what it seems like), then I think it makes better sense to isolate the disconnection before attempting to add a larger capacitor.

In that regard, you can bypass the switch entirely (by just soldering wires so that the toy is on all the time) and then see if you still have the interruption. If you don't, then, as already suggested, replace the switch with one that can maintain conductivity with a bump. If not then look elsewhere, like the battery connection.

The problem with adding a higher value capacitor is that you don't know how long the disruption lasts and don't know what value to use to "cover" the power during the drop out. What's more, if it is flaky switch or connection elsewhere, it could be progressive such that a larger capacitor might compensate for a while and then the same problem occurs.
 

Thread Starter

Griffin5335

Joined Sep 12, 2018
6
Great suggestions raymond ill try that, ive built 2 of these prototypes and they both act the same. Im pretty sure its the switch, do any of you have a suggestion on a good supplier of switches that arent cheap garbage?



If you assume that the problem is a brief disconnection of power caused by a bump (which is what it seems like), then I think it makes better sense to isolate the disconnection before attempting to add a larger capacitor.

In that regard, you can bypass the switch entirely (by just soldering wires so that the toy is on all the time) and then see if you still have the interruption. If you don't, then, as already suggested, replace the switch with one that can maintain conductivity with a bump. If not then look elsewhere, like the battery connection.

The problem with adding a higher value capacitor is that you don't know how long the disruption lasts and don't know what value to use to "cover" the power during the drop out. What's more, if it is flaky switch or connection elsewhere, it could be progressive such that a larger capacitor might compensate for a while and then the same problem occurs.
 
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