Any Windows10 Wizards?

Thread Starter

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
23,906
I do not use my Win10 PC, unless I have to.
I cannot seem to be able to set it to acknowledge as me as the Administrator, i.e. cannot place files where I would like to.
I went through the on line recommended way to set as Administrator and it show I evidentially am in the 'Setting' panel.
But still cannot save files where I want to?
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
7,913
Windows 10 is much stricter in its security than any previous version of Windows.

Administrators are not all powerful. They still require elevation in certain circumstances, as you have found. Certain folders have very strict access control.

You have three options. None require you making yourself an administrator.

Change your configurations and folder structure so that you do not need access to system / protected folders.

Run File Manager with Administrator privileges. Copy and move files with this enabled app instance.

Run the app requiring secure folder access, with Administrator privileges. It’s possible to set the application properties to always have Administrative privileges, but this is not recommended, as it is not secure and open to problems.

To run an app with Administrator privileges, right click on the app icon and select “Run As Administrator “. To always run an app as Administrator, right click on the app icon, select Properties, select the Security tab and check the “Run As Administrator” box. Then save.
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
7,913
Hello there :)Wizards. Sorcerers. Gurus.
Necromancers. Are some of my best friends.
Windows 10
On your File Explorer, right-click the My Documents folder.
Click Properties.
Click on the Security tab, then go to Advanced.
Locate your account and see if you have full access.
If you want to edit or change your access, close the Advanced window to go back to the Security page.
Once in the Security window, click Edit.
Check all Allow boxes, click Apply, OK, then OK again
Again, from a security standpoint, not recommended. Use one of the three methods above.

This method allows open access to all documents by all methods if your account is compromised. By not tying security to just an account, but to an account / app combo adds another layer of security.

Of course. If you don’t give a crap who has access to your files, go for the easy method. I just think you should know what you’re risking
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
7,913
Every box seems to be checked, still not working!
Every box is checked where? My comments identify at least three windows to change settings? Some are permanent; others are temporary.

Plus solution #1 doesn’t require ANY settings to be changed. Configuration, yes; settings, no. Please reply with more complete information.
 

eetech00

Joined Jun 8, 2013
2,644
Every box seems to be checked, still not working!
Open "control panel". (you can search for this in the search box if you don't know where it is)
Then in Control Panel, Click "User Accounts".

You should see towards the top right your account name and priviledge.
It should read something like:

USER_ME
Local Account Administrator
Password Protected

You have to verify this first before doing anything else.

When you report a displayed Windows message, please be specific with the exact wording.
It will make an important difference on how to solve the problem.
 

Thread Starter

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
23,906
No luck so far, tried a few things suggested, I want to store files in the sub folders here, I tried changing the root directory, here is a sample, it won't accept any ticked boxes. Full Control or Modify
1624906638762.png
 

eetech00

Joined Jun 8, 2013
2,644
No luck so far, tried a few things suggested, I want to store files in the sub folders here, I tried changing the root directory, here is a sample, it won't accept any ticked boxes. Full Control or Modify
View attachment 242347
1. Did you confirm the info as described in post #8
Your logon account will not have admin rights until it shows as described.

2. What is the message displayed when you attempt to copy a file to the folder you've shown?
 

Thread Starter

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
23,906
This is all I found.
this
Open "control panel". (you can search for this in the search box if you don't know where it is)
Then in Control Panel, Click "User Accounts".
didn't produce anything relevant at all?



1624922629869.png
 

Thread Starter

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
23,906
OK, the control panel shows.
Under User accounts:

My Log in Name
My email address.
Administrator
Password Protected.

Nothing else.
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
7,913
This is all I found.
this
Open "control panel". (you can search for this in the search box if you don't know where it is)
Then in Control Panel, Click "User Accounts".
didn't produce anything relevant at all?



View attachment 242357
What application produced this message?

Did you run it as Administrator?

Even if your account is an Administrator, an application under Windows 10 hato be told to use Administrator rights.

There are two ways of doing this. Right click on the app’s icon and select “Run as Administrator”. Or right click, select properties, go to the Security tab, and check off “Run as Administrstor” (or something similar)

Edit: corrected typo
 

Thread Starter

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
23,906
Most programs I run that sets up and uses default file directories. e.g. Photoshop etc, if I try and store any pictures or photos of my own, it shows the admonition as in #12.
 

Tesla23

Joined May 10, 2009
488
My approach for installing / running programs that don't respect Windows rules on the Program Files directory is to leave that and all it's privileges alone. Even if you appear to have solved the access rights, you can run into issues where Windows - trying to be 'helpful', saves files in special hidden directories that create all sorts of confusion if you go looking for them.

I create a separate directory like c:/MyProgramFiles, create that under my own reduced user privileges, and then simply install older / non compliant programs there. My access rights seem to propagate down nicely.

My understanding it that there is merit in running with reduced user privileges and needing elevated rights to modify the ProgramFiles directory in order to reduce the risks from malware.
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
7,913
Most programs I run that sets up and uses default file directories. e.g. Photoshop etc, if I try and store any pictures or photos of my own, it shows the admonition as in #12.
Have you tried setting the app to run as Administrator, as I described above? The Arduino IDE requires it. I think LTSPice does too, if you override it’s default locations.
 

eetech00

Joined Jun 8, 2013
2,644
I think the file system permissions have been thrashed, And it will take a drastic step to correct them.

I've been using win10 since its release. You shouldn't have to do anything special to run your programs. The programs automatically setup the appropriate permissions when installed. When copying a file to a privileged area, and admin rights are working correctly, you would be prompted by windows that "admin permissions are needed" and a "continue" button is presented. You would simply press "continue", admin permission would be transparently granted, and the file would be copied.

There is an "icacls * /t /q /c /reset" command that will reset all file and folder permission.
Problem is....it may break permissions previously setup by other programs when they were installed.
So you should create a "system restore point", before using the icacls command, so you can return the system back to its previous state if something goes wrong.

Lastly, windows file system security settings shouldn't be altered. It is configured the way it is for good reason. I never touch the file permissions on the C: Drive. I have a dedicated "data" hard disk drive I use for any user data generated by programs and make it a habit to store files I've created there. It makes it easy to backup/restore. Another benefit is most Virus's attack drive C: because most of the time it "exists", and generally don't touch other drives. A data drive allows one to "wipe" drive C: and restore from the data drive after scanning.

One other thing you can check, before doing the things I mentioned above, is the UAC (User Account Control) setting. It's in Control Panel->User Accounts->Change User Account Control Settings. It should be set like this:

1624951574444.png

If you change this setting, you have to reboot your computer so it will take affect.
 
Last edited:

Thread Starter

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
23,906
Doesn't seem worth the effort, guess I will live with the way it is for now.
Another black mark for Windows in my eyes. :(
 
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