4 pin Led strip to motion sensor controller

Thread Starter

SumoTori

Joined Apr 2, 2024
4
We need to install led strip lights on our stairs. We want to get a controller with motion sensors. However, from what we have seen, all the controllers with motion sensors are 2 pin and the led strip lights we have are 4 pin RGB. My wife bought multiple rolls of 4 pin RGB light strips on clearance when our local lighting store closed.
My questions are, does anyone sell a 4 pin controller that is made for this application? If not, is there any issue connecting the negative and positive to the 2 pin controller. Will that activate only the white leds and the RGB function will be inactive?
 

ElectricSpidey

Joined Dec 2, 2017
2,774
First you must determine that the strips are not addressable types.

Then once you have determined that they are standard common cathode/anode RGB...

For the common cathode type:
Connect all of the anodes together and then to the positive output of the controller.
Then connect the cathode to the negative output.


For the common anode type:
Connect all of the cathodes together and connect to the negative output of the controller.
Then connect the anode to the positive output.

This will produce a kind of crappy white light.

This all assumes that the controller outputs the correct voltage and has a proper wattage rating, and the controller is not just a switch and provides an active output.
 
Last edited:

Thread Starter

SumoTori

Joined Apr 2, 2024
4
First you must determine that the strips are not addressable types.

Then once you have determined that they are standard common cathode/anode RGB...

For the common cathode type:
Connect all of the anodes together and then to the positive output of the controller.
Then connect the cathode to the negative output.


For the common anode type:
Connect all of the cathodes together and connect to the negative output of the controller.
Then connect the anode to the positive output.

This will produce a kind of crappy white light.

This all assumes that the controller outputs the correct voltage and has a proper wattage rating, and the controller is not just a switch and provides an active output.
Is it possible to identify it by simply looking at it? 17121057722977063709620731979053.jpg
 

ElectricSpidey

Joined Dec 2, 2017
2,774
That strip looks like an addressable RGB chip along with a discrete white LED. (actually 3 each between cut lines)

Do you have a model number?

If I'm reading it correctly, I see at the cut line...

+12V
DO/DIN
GND
W

+12V, DO/DIN and GND are the connections for a typical single data line addressable strip.

I can take a guess that "W" is the positive connection for the white LED.

I would take a guess that connecting the GND (negative) and the W (positive) to 12 volts DC will light the white LEDs.

Although the terminal marked "W" could be the white LEDs ground.
 
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Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
7,899
That strip looks like an addressable RGB chip along with a discrete white LED. (actually 3 each between cut lines)
Do you have a model number?
If I'm reading it correctly, I see at the cut line...
+12V
DO/DIN
GND
W
+12V, DO/DIN and GND are the connections for a typical single data line addressable strip.
I can take a guess that "W" is the positive connection for the white LED.
I would take a guess that connecting the GND (negative) and the W (positive) to 12 volts DC will light the white LEDs.
Although the terminal marked "W" could be the white LEDs ground.
Good advice. And for the sake of the whole strip - cut just the last three LED section off and use that for testing. But yes, that's definitely an addressable LED strip. If you can get away with just running the white LED's you'll have what you are looking for. Testing is the key. Even 9V will give you some measure of light on the white LED's. If it were me I'd cut the last segment off of one and try it. That is if I were going for the white color. And as ElectricSpidey said, W is a guess. A reasonable guess, but just that; a guess. And with each test try it for only a half second or shorter. Long enough to know if you got it right. Too long on a reverse current and you could blow the section out. That's also why I suggest cutting one section off and using that as a sacrificial test specimen.
 

Thread Starter

SumoTori

Joined Apr 2, 2024
4
First you must determine that the strips are not addressable types.

Then once you have determined that they are standard common cathode/anode RGB...

For the common cathode type:
Connect all of the anodes together and then to the positive output of the controller.
Then connect the cathode to the negative output.


For the common anode type:
Connect all of the cathodes together and connect to the negative output of the controller.
Then connect the anode to the positive output.

This will produce a kind of crappy white light.

This all assumes that the controller outputs the correct voltage and has a proper wattage rating, and the controller is not just a switch and provides an active output.
That was the wrong one. Looking at the box I realized that it's a cheap product my wife got from Walmart. The set I want to use is from Phillips but i'm not sure what model. We moved not that long ago and it's still in
That strip looks like an addressable RGB chip along with a discrete white LED. (actually 3 each between cut lines)

Do you have a model number?

If I'm reading it correctly, I see at the cut line...

+12V
DO/DIN
GND
W

+12V, DO/DIN and GND are the connections for a typical single data line addressable strip.

I can take a guess that "W" is the positive connection for the white LED.

I would take a guess that connecting the GND (negative) and the W (positive) to 12 volts DC will light the white LEDs.

Although the terminal marked "W" could be the white LEDs ground.
Thank you for the info! The funny thing is that is a cheap led my wife got from Walmart on clearance.
The other led srtips are Phillips but I can't find them. They are in one of several boxes we have yet to unpack. If these cheap ones work I would rather use them than waste the Phillips. If they don't work out, I'm going to buy some 2 pin led strips.
I wish I could find a 4 pin controller to make them work on the stairs but I don't really need the stairs to look like a disco. I just need them lighted so that I don't fall down another the stairs again. I did that once, and it left me completely disabled. If it was to happen again I would probably end up like Humty Dumty.
When I get home I will find that model number.
Thank you again!
 

Thread Starter

SumoTori

Joined Apr 2, 2024
4
Good advice. And for the sake of the whole strip - cut just the last three LED section off and use that for testing. But yes, that's definitely an addressable LED strip. If you can get away with just running the white LED's you'll have what you are looking for. Testing is the key. Even 9V will give you some measure of light on the white LED's. If it were me I'd cut the last segment off of one and try it. That is if I were going for the white color. And as ElectricSpidey said, W is a guess. A reasonable guess, but just that; a guess. And with each test try it for only a half second or shorter. Long enough to know if you got it right. Too long on a reverse current and you could blow the section out. That's also why I suggest cutting one section off and using that as a sacrificial test specimen.
Thank you for the good idea. I will definitely test it like that. I have a background in telecom so this it should be easy to do. However, I'm always a bit over cautious and don't want to ruin stuff or waste time.
Thankfully places like this always have lots of people with the knowledge needed.
Thank you again!
 
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