120v 2 male 1 female -AC connection

Thread Starter

Miss Maple

Joined Apr 13, 2022
4
Hello

I have 2 switches that run on 120v ea. and activate via a control panel which is separate from 120v that I'm talking about here. So each switch is. one for humidity and the other is for CO2. they get connected via 120 vote outlet and then in RJ 45 to a control panel.

What I want to do is this.
I want to make a 2 male 1 female plug both male plugs would be plugged into one switch each and plugged into the mains.
So when switch (A) activates the humidity switch and it turns on.
When switch (B) turns on the same fan would run., Via the new plug.
I'm no educated person when it comes to stuff like this but l like to
tinker.
I guess in the end I want to know if I can do it without electrocuting myself, burning down my house or frying my stuff.
When I think about it, it should be OK as I'm not increasing the power, 120 V is 120 V and so long as I don't unplug any of the 2 male plugs while one of them is live, I should not get electrocuted. No? if that is the correct way of thinking but I'm probably wrong" a few of these points.


no there is something that I can use that can do the exact what I want and without having me to build some kind of elaborate possibly dangerous wiring I'm all ears I know there's logic gates that out there but I have no clue how they work so. Preferably something plug-in play with a few wirings here and there like I said I do not mind tinkering.
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
5,642
Welcome to AAC.

A drawing of how you propose to connect this with all the parts and how they are hooked up would go a long way in understanding what you are trying to do.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
11,874
What I think you are suggesting is a scheme for one fan to be directly mains powered from either one or both sources.
That can be done, but not as described, for several reasons: First, if one of the paralleled plugs was not inserted it would certainly be an open and potentially deadly shock hazard. But also, because the probability of the line and neutral being transposed between the two male plugs, and the result shorted circuit causing at best a violent fuse clearing, or at worst the destruction of one of your control switches, probably rather violently, with a loud POP!
The good news is that THERE IS a rather simple way to achieve the same goal safely. That scheme will require having both switcher functions in a single box, wired in parallel, within that single box, with one male mains supply connection, and one female fan connection.
At this point I am guessing that possibly both of the sensor devices will require mains power for their operation. That will add a small amount of additional wiring, but it will use the same scheme.
 

Thread Starter

Miss Maple

Joined Apr 13, 2022
4
What I think you are suggesting is a scheme for one fan to be directly mains powered from either one or both sources.
That can be done, but not as described, for several reasons: First, if one of the paralleled plugs was not inserted it would certainly be an open and potentially deadly shock hazard. But also, because the probability of the line and neutral being transposed between the two male plugs, and the result shorted circuit causing at best a violent fuse clearing, or at worst the destruction of one of your control switches, probably rather violently, with a loud POP!
The good news is that THERE IS a rather simple way to achieve the same goal safely. That scheme will require having both switcher functions in a single box, wired in parallel, within that single box, with one male mains supply connection, and one female fan connection.
At this point I am guessing that possibly both of the sensor devices will require mains power for their operation. That will add a small amount of additional wiring, but it will use the same scheme.
that’s pretty much exactly what I was thinking of. I think I understand what you were explaining, but as I said in my post I'm not very educated on this stuff and it seems like it might be over my head on this nonetheless thank you.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
11,874
that’s pretty much exactly what I was thinking of. I think I understand what you were explaining, but as I said in my post I'm not very educated on this stuff and it seems like it might be over my head on this nonetheless thank you.
If the TS had known about how to do it they would not have asked. That is why I did my best to be clear about how to do what it seems that was desired.
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
5,642
that’s pretty much exactly what I was thinking of. I think I understand what you were explaining, but as I said in my post I'm not very educated on this stuff and it seems like it might be over my head on this nonetheless thank you.
I think we can help you do what you want but since it involves mains voltages it is very important that we are crystal clear about what you are trying to do and how you are trying to do it.

If you make a simple wiring diagram with part numbers, I am sure we can assist you.
 

Thread Starter

Miss Maple

Joined Apr 13, 2022
4
Im sorry I do not understand...TS?

I think we can help you do what you want but since it involves mains voltages it is very important that we are crystal clear about what you are trying to do and how you are trying to do it.

If you make a simple wiring diagram with part numbers, I am sure we can assist you.

Well @Yaakov
I hope this helps I downloaded a wiring program free trial thing and this is what it made me I'm hoping it makes sense as I had really no idea what I was doing with the program https://www.dropbox.com/s/jwtqot9q2jk1477/Diagram1.pdf?dl=0
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
5,642

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
11,874
The important part is to have an adequate understanding of the connections to the devices. And, of course, for the devices to be intended to work with the available mans voltage, bot as operational power source and for switching of mains power to the load.

and I think that you paid way to much for that drawing program, even if it was free.
Can you post links to the descriptions of the humidity sensor and the carbon dioxide sensor that you are intending to use? That will help us understand how they get connected to the fan.
Also, how does an RJ45 (8 position, plastic , low voltage), connector fit in this discussion?? aIt is not rated for mains power at all.
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
5,642
Yes it is the Trolmaster Hydro-X Environment Control System
100~240VAC/0.2A,32~122℉,<90%RH.
The probable solution is to build a controller using two relays like this one. You can mount them in a NEMA enclosure which you can find easily and will protect them from moisture and you from them.
1649981589608.png

You can see the schematic of the relay on the bottom. Pins 0 and 1 are the coil. One relay's coil would be wired (in a particular way, described below) to each of your sensors. The sensor would turn on the relay rather than the fan to control it indirectly and provide the logic you need.

Pins 4 and 8 are the common connections for the two switches inside the relay. It is a DPDT (Double Pole Double Throw) type which means it has two independent switches, and two contacts—one normally open (NO) and one normally closed.

"Normal" for the relay is not energized. That is, what ever the contact is "normally", it is when the relay coil has no power to it. We are going to take advantage of the all the bits of this relay.

Here's how it works: Each relay's coil is connected to its respective sensor through the NC (normally closed) contacts on one of the poles. That is, the neutral goes directly to one side of the coil, say on pin 0. The other side of the coil, pin 1, goes to the NC contact on the other relay, you can use pin 7. Finally, the live from our current relay's sensor, the one that is to turn this relay on, is connected to the common on the other relay, using pin 8.

Each is wired in a complementary fashion with the power to the relay's coil dependent on the other relay not being energized. I hope you are following. The result is that if one of the relays has been turned on by it's paired sensor, the other can't be turned on because when the other relay is energized the NO contacts are broken and the circuit to the relay's coil is interrupted.

Finally, power for the fan, not coming from either sensor, just a receptacle, is wired on each relay to the other relay's pin 4, the common of the other pole and the live connection to the fan is made from both relays pin 2, the NO contact which will make when the relay is energized.

The neutral to the fan does not have to be switched.

To recap: each relay has the ability to interrupt the circuit of the other and supply power to the fan. Whichever really is energized, it will disable the other and power the fan. If one sensor starts the fan and the other sensor tries to start it after it has been disabled, it will do nothing (the fan is already running) but if the other sensor's threshold is reached and it turns off, while the second sensor is still calling for fan, the control circuit for the relay will become operational and so it will power the fan. There is no diminishing of functionality.

You will need three line cords, "quick connect" crimp connector for the relays' terminals, a housing, and a pigtail with a female power connector.

One cord goes to each sensor for relay activation. The third cord is for fan power. The female pigtail is to plug in the fan.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
11,874
Yes it is the Trolmaster Hydro-X Environment Control System
100~240VAC/0.2A,32~122℉,<90%RH.
Based on the information, and lack of information, in the link I would choose to avoid that product completely. I readthe whole manual and there are none of the required details provided to describe the actual connection interface. All of the descriptions are about connecting different modules with modular plugs and cables.
Not one word about actual power control connections.
 
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