Z *Z = X*X + Y * Y, only for 2,

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MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
24,609
We don't know until you give us the context.

It was Pythagoras who described it for a right-angled triangle. Even though it is described as Pythagoras' Theorem it was in use by the Babylonians long before Pythagoras came along.
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
17,242
Not exactly, since that relationship for triangles was know to the ancient Greeks. What Pierre de Fermat did was to advance a conjecture, for which he claimed that he had a proof, that there were no integer solutions for n > 2.

From Wikipedia
In number theory, Fermat's Last Theorem (sometimes called Fermat's conjecture, especially in older texts) states that no three positive integers a, b, and c satisfy the equation a^n + b^n = c^n for any integer value of n greater than 2. The cases n = 1 and n = 2 have been known since antiquity to have infinitely many solutions.[1]
 

ZCochran98

Joined Jul 24, 2018
179
It was Pythagoras who described it for a right-angled triangle. Even though it is described as Pythagoras' Theorem it was in use by the Babylonians long before Pythagoras came along.
And quite possibly the Egyptians as well before even the Babylonians, though perhaps not quite as generally as the Babylonians did. They were particularly fond of the 3-4-5 right triangle.
 

MrSalts

Joined Apr 2, 2020
712
Not exactly, since that relationship for triangles was know to the ancient Greeks. What Pierre de Fermat did was to advance a conjecture, for which he claimed that he had a proof, that there were no integer solutions for n > 2.

From Wikipedia
In number theory, Fermat's Last Theorem (sometimes called Fermat's conjecture, especially in older texts) states that no three positive integers a, b, and c satisfy the equation a^n + b^n = c^n for any integer value of n greater than 2. The cases n = 1 and n = 2 have been known since antiquity to have infinitely many solutions.[1]
If Fermat had an FPU, he wouldn't have worried so much about restricting his theorizing to integers and many hours of good quality math research effort could have been out towards more productive things. .
 

Thread Starter

Deleted member 115935

Joined Dec 31, 1969
0
Thank you @BobTPH
Fermat's last theorem was the name could not remember

remembered pythagorous, which is the n = 2 part for a right angled triangle,
 
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