Your go to connectors? No more terminal blocks!

Thread Starter

RIKRIK

Joined Oct 11, 2019
78
Okay currently have a few different projects going on, Iv been using terminal blocks, wago connectors and crimp/spade connectors. which is all getting abit ridiculous, I did order some Anderson connectors as all my projects are under 50a and i could un-connect them.

However i have no experience with that type of connector, but it was big and bright yellow and for some strange reason that really floated my boat. i am wondering if any other people have a standardized connector they use and what they like and dislike about it.
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kind regards,
Rik
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
2,006
Those are what I see typically used for RC vehicle batteries to make them fast swap-outs. Bugger to get the wire tinned and sweated into that socket but then I've only done it a few times. They say practice makes perfect. YMMV
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
7,179
It's much better to crimp large, high current connectors than solder. All you need is a small sludge and a hammer crimp.

 

Thread Starter

RIKRIK

Joined Oct 11, 2019
78
True had a look online, do have a crimp tool but apparently they make one for the connector. But its expensive, i did see afew videos on flood soldering
apparently its not the best method from afew comments, but i give it a go i guess, 10 of them comming, 10 tries to get it right.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
7,179
True had a look online, do have a crimp tool but apparently they make one for the connector. But its expensive, i did see afew videos on flood soldering
apparently its not the best method from afew comments, but i give it a go i guess, 10 of them comming, 10 tries to get it right.
It will work in a pinch (I would worry about the quality of the solder to wire bond) but soldering high current connectors makes them a high failure item. What's also need is a mechanical (cold weld) connection of the wire to the lug shell. Solder can warm during operation and flow, letting the wire move out of the connection. In a high current circuit short circuit condition (fuses make time to operate) even a perfect solder connection might be the highest resistance point of the circuit causing the connection to heat rapidly, melt the solder and start an arc inside the connector as the solder boils out.
 
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Thread Starter

RIKRIK

Joined Oct 11, 2019
78
Okay thats good to know, i will proberly look for another means then, my max amp will be 15a @ 12v. My projects envole different elements having to be hooked up, so i liked the fact i could un-plug them for storage. I will however give it a go, showing i got them comming.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
7,179
Okay thats good to know, i will proberly look for another means then, my max amp will be 15a @ 12v. My projects envole different elements having to be hooked up, so i liked the fact i could un-plug them for storage. I will however give it a go, showing i got them comming.
If you have a current limited voltage source it should be OK but batteries can deliver hundreds of amps in a short conditions so use good fusing matched to the wire and expected current draw.
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
2,006
They do make mechanical ratcheting hand crimpers for up to at least 2AWG. Uses lever action to gain the mechanical advantage for crimping.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
20,405
They do make mechanical ratcheting hand crimpers for up to at least 2AWG. Uses lever action to gain the mechanical advantage for crimping.
They also make the for up to size 1/0 (8mm) lugs, (two handed!).
Some line-men sizes can go much larger!
Max.
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
2,006
Yep our electricians had a longarmed one like a mechanical tube bender they used for up to 500MCM. One guy to operate the handle while the other guy aligns the wire and crimp end. Then when the guy put tension on it with the handle they would both put their weight on the long-armed handle to make the crimp. They eventually replaced it with a hydraulic unit.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
20,405
Yep our electricians had a longarmed one like a mechanical tube bender they used for up to 500MCM. One guy to operate the handle while the other guy aligns the wire and crimp end. Then when the guy put tension on it with the handle they would both put their weight on the long-armed handle to make the crimp. They eventually replaced it with a hydraulic unit.
Incidentally, in the past, these were often solder potted, but most jurisdictions have banned the use of this method in favour of crimp/compression only, now.
Max.
 
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Thread Starter

RIKRIK

Joined Oct 11, 2019
78
I wonder, i got some 2% silver solder kicking about, i wonder if that would mitigate the resistance. Also i have a selction of trip fuses i use , so it will be fused.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
20,405
I wonder, i got some 2% silver solder kicking about, i wonder if that would mitigate the resistance. Also i have a selction of trip fuses i use , so it will be fused.
As someone who was trained during the time of solder-potting, I never saw any evidence of failure, but I suspect some did not eliminate dry joint/high resistance etc.
If the heating is sufficient and enough wetting takes place, silver solder may work.
Max.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
7,179
[
I wonder, i got some 2% silver solder kicking about, i wonder if that would mitigate the resistance. Also i have a selction of trip fuses i use , so it will be fused.
Just consider the solder joint as a fusible link. Silver solder will melt before the wire does. There are two types of connections mechanical and electrical. If there is any amount of pull on the wire it's likely to part at the solder connection during a high current fault condition. A properly crimped connection is usually stronger than the lug.
 

Thread Starter

RIKRIK

Joined Oct 11, 2019
78
If i was selling a product i would happily go out and buy the best kit for the job, but as something i will only be using for hobby purposes, man in shed stuff, No extreme environment , pulling, vibrating. The solder potting is the cheapest. Dont get me wrong if solder starts oozing out of my connectors or the connector gets hot then to try the crimping, solder is pretty much 60/40 but 2percent silver, i would imagine it would make the joint more conductive,lowering resistance.minimising heat. While maintaining the properties of the 60/40. Do you think the move to lead free solder might have put the nail in the coffin for potting, as it is illegal in europe for products to use leaded solder, oh and merry brexit everyone
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
20,405
Do you think the move to lead free solder might have put the nail in the coffin for potting, as it is illegal in europe for products to use leaded solder, oh and merry brexit everyone
When I was involved in potting power lugs (UK) , there was still 'real' plumbers, i.e. the wipers of lead joints, one of them taught me the art, in order to wipe a H.V. electrical gland fitting. ;)
Max.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
7,179
This man in the shed uses a $12 hammer crimper for large lugs.

Really large professionally crimped lugs. The looped cable is 4/0
 

gramps

Joined Dec 8, 2014
81
Okay thats good to know, i will proberly look for another means then, my max amp will be 15a @ 12v. My projects envole different elements having to be hooked up, so i liked the fact i could un-plug them for storage. I will however give it a go, showing i got them comming.
For 15 amps you want these
https://www.amazon.com/Anderson-Powerpole-Connectors-20-Pair/dp/B00GPRIC8Y/ref=sr_1_1?crid=2MJ9EFYXEGEXX&keywords=anderson+power+poles+15+amp&qid=1580443556&sprefix=anderson+power+poles+15,aps,221&sr=8-1
 
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