Where is the current to the loads coming from ?

Thread Starter

Externet

Joined Nov 29, 2005
1,847
Good day.
Two sychronized generators, 'single' spilt phase 230VAC as in U.S. standard. Fixed regulated voltages. Two paralleled loads. I have difficulty visualizing the currents direction in wires A,B,C.
The loads are not in series as the sketch below may mislead, they are both 'normal' phase to phase in parallel, -say 4KW each if it matters-


Generator1:230VAC/60Hz======A======load1=======B=======load2======C======231VAC/60HzGenerator2
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
9,741
The electrons (current) in an AC circuit sort of sit and wiggle back and forth. They don't really go anywhere. ;)

It's an AC circuit with shared generation.
What does current to the loads coming from actually mean? Is one generator being at 230VAC and the other at 231VAC a factor in this question? If so that implies a imperfect (impedance) wiring with resistance and losses with some sort of load sharing system. Maybe you really mean energy/power?

https://www.csemag.com/articles/apportioning-loads-on-paralleled-generator-sets/
https://www.theengineeringknowledge.com/synchronous-generators-parallel-with-same-size-generators/
 
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Thread Starter

Externet

Joined Nov 29, 2005
1,847
Thanks. Well, if you prefer, take it as 'where is the power to the loads coming/supplied from ?' Yes, that is a factor in the question.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
9,741
Thanks. Well, if you prefer, take it as 'where is the power to the loads coming/supplied from ?' Yes, that is a factor in the question.
It's a factor that makes simple calculation (50% load sharing for the same, equally driven, generators) impossible without the specifics of why, on a parallel circuit, voltages are not the same at all points across the parallel circuit.

Nobody today configures shared generation without load power control on the generator(s) unless you want to destroy something.
https://www.fgwilson.ie/files/generator-set-load-sharing-of-paralleled-generators.pdf

You would use voltage and current phase measurements at each generator and load node for reactive and real power supplied to the network load as control data. Then use the load-sharing control system for how much power each genset should supply to the power network.

https://ewh.ieee.org/soc/pes/newyork/Archive Docs/CumminsPowerSeminar_Basics of Paralleling 169.pdf
 
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