What is the smallest radio receiver?

Discussion in 'Wireless & RF Design' started by Satay, May 3, 2018.

  1. Satay

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 3, 2018
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    A one way radio receiver powered by the radio signal it's receiving (similar to a crystal radio), with a tiny crystal or piezo speaker, and using bone conduction to get the sound to the inner ear.
    How small can it be, and can it be taped or glued to the bone behind the ear (similar to the way Google Glass conducts sound)???
    Is it possible to make this tiny radio say 1/8th of an inch in size or smaller???
     
  2. Hymie

    Active Member

    Mar 30, 2018
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    It would appear so:-

    https://www.seas.harvard.edu/news/2...eceiver-has-building-blocks-size-of-two-atoms
     
  3. BR-549

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 22, 2013
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    I don't believe the inter-ear bone conduction is a reference to electrical conduction. I remember it being a mechanical connection.
     
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  4. Satay

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 3, 2018
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    Yes, the bone conducts sound, not electricity.

    Also the nano sized radio linked above is theoretical.
    Could a radio receiver 1/8 of an inch in size be built with technology that has existed within the last 50 years?
    Again powered by the radio signal and using bone conduction to get the sound to the ear?
     
  5. BR-549

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 22, 2013
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    "Could a radio receiver 1/8 of an inch in size be built with technology that has existed within the last 50 years?"

    Yes...but not with an antenna. Radio...yes. Antenna...no. Audio....yes. Fast data.....~no.

    "Again powered by the radio signal and using bone conduction to get the sound to the ear?"

    Not that I am aware of. A tuned piezo implanted in bone might do it. But not aware a such.

    The bone structures are usually upstream from most ear problems. The research is with electrical to the brain.....bypassing most of ear structure. For good ears, with have earphones.
     
  6. DickCappels

    Moderator

    Aug 21, 2008
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    You might have difficulty getting enough mass in that 1/8 inch cube to get substantial volume via bone conduction. Come to think about it, you would probably have difficulty capturing enough energy to power a bone conduction transducer if the antenna needs to fit inside that cube.
     
  7. danadak

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 10, 2018
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