Testing electronic components

Discussion in 'Test & Measurement Forum' started by Richavit Tampus Pasibog, May 9, 2019.

  1. Richavit Tampus Pasibog

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 6, 2019
    6
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    Are there any methods to test electronic components without using any instrument?
     
  2. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    No more than a visual examination of the component!
    Build a compatible circuit that utilizes the features of the component in question.
    Observe the results.:confused:
    Max.
     
  3. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    No such thing. Electronic components are electronic.
    You need electrons to test electronic components.
     
    sagor likes this.
  4. kubeek

    Expert

    Sep 20, 2005
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    I would call that a test instrument ;)
     
  5. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    How about this? :p

    upload_2019-5-9_10-55-37.png

    Max.:)
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2019
    spinnaker and Reloadron like this.
  6. dendad

    Distinguished Member

    Feb 20, 2016
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    You need at least a multimeter...
    AN8008.jpg
    Search Ebay or Amazon for "AN8008"
    and these testers are pretty good value too...
    ComponentTester.jpg
    Search Ebay or Amazon for "component tester"
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2019
  7. Tonyr1084

    Distinguished Member

    Sep 24, 2015
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    I've tested batteries with a small motor and a soda bottle cap glued on the end of the shaft. Stick a small piece of plastic against the ribbing of the cap and then run the motor with the battery. The stronger the battery the higher the pitch produced by the plastic strip and the ribbing of the cap.

    Now I wouldn't call a motor a test "instrument", but I would agree it's being used as one.
     
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  8. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    In my youth I tested using a coil of magnet wire and a magnetised sewing needle.
    I would still have to call that an instrument.
     
  9. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    Your first test instrument (besides your brains) ought to be a multimeter, analogue or digital.
     
  10. Tonyr1084

    Distinguished Member

    Sep 24, 2015
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    9V battery. Tongue. Is it live? Or is it Memorex?
     
  11. Richavit Tampus Pasibog

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 6, 2019
    6
    1
    Okay sir. Thanks!
     
    MaxHeadRoom likes this.
  12. shteii01

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2010
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    the smoke signals.
    u see smoke, bad
    no smoke, good
     
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  13. Tonyr1084

    Distinguished Member

    Sep 24, 2015
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    This method only works with FRESH smoke. Stale smoke will be much more difficult to detect.
     
  14. rsjsouza

    Active Member

    Apr 21, 2014
    165
    61
    You can always use a lightbulb, two or three wires and a battery (safer) or a mains plug (bad idea, unless you know what you are doing). In the vaccum tube days, people repaired radios this way.

    You can even use this simple circuit as a limiter and test entire sets with it; ;)
    https://www.vintage-radio.com/projects/lamp-limiter.html
     
  15. BR-549

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 22, 2013
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    Yes, turn it on.
     
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