Supplying Multiple Devices From One Battery

Thread Starter

Harshik

Joined Jan 13, 2017
8
Hello Everyone,

For my project, I'm planning to charge a battery using solar power. The battery rating decided is 12V. After that i am supposed to use the battery to power the following using the battery:

a.) 6v to the arduino
b.) 12v to a coin acceptor
c.) 5v 1A to 10 devices.

I'm confused and don't know where to start, could anyone suggest any books, links, or methods which could help me in doing this.....

Please and thanks for your help.
 

LesJones

Joined Jan 8, 2017
3,520
You could use a switching regulator such as this for the 5 volts at 1 amp. (I am assuming you mean the 10 devices take a total of 1 amp.) I don't think that it would be worth using a switching regulator for the Arduino as it probably only takes a couple of hundred mA (You don't say which model of Arduino.) You could use a linear regulator such as an LM317 to generate the 6 volt supply. The coin acceptor could be fed directly from the 12 volts.

Les.
 

Thread Starter

Harshik

Joined Jan 13, 2017
8
You could use a switching regulator such as this for the 5 volts at 1 amp. (I am assuming you mean the 10 devices take a total of 1 amp.) I don't think that it would be worth using a switching regulator for the Arduino as it probably only takes a couple of hundred mA (You don't say which model of Arduino.) You could use a linear regulator such as an LM317 to generate the 6 volt supply. The coin acceptor could be fed directly from the 12 volts.

Les.
Its for 10 devices one amp per device (charging mobile phones).
 

Thread Starter

Harshik

Joined Jan 13, 2017
8
Are you certain that the Arduino must have 6V?
5V should work.
According to the online website, the recommended input voltage is set to 7 to 12 V. However, i thought that a higher voltage would require more power so i decided to keep it at 6V. Yes the arduino uses only 5V for the supply, however the output that i achieve using the regulator may not be exact, so in order to keep the arduino fed sufficiently, i decided to supply it with 6 V.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
24,441
Does the Arduino employ a linear voltage regulator IC?
If it does then your supply voltage has to exceed the 5V plus the drop-out voltage of the regulator.
 

LesJones

Joined Jan 8, 2017
3,520
6 volts is NOT within the range of 7 to 12 volts. If you supply the Aduino with only 6 volts you will probably need to replace the onboard regulator with one with a very low dropout voltage. If you use a linear regulator you will not save any power. It will just move some of the power loss from the onboard regulator to the to the 12 to 6 volt regulator. If you are that concerned about power saving then use a switch mode regulator straight down to 5 volts and bypass the onboard regulator on the Arduino. For your phone charging I would suggest using 10 switch mode regulators with built in current limiting. You could also use a single one rated at 12 amps or more and fuse each output a 1 amp.

Les.
 

Thread Starter

Harshik

Joined Jan 13, 2017
8
6 volts is NOT within the range of 7 to 12 volts. If you supply the Aduino with only 6 volts you will probably need to replace the onboard regulator with one with a very low dropout voltage. If you use a linear regulator you will not save any power. It will just move some of the power loss from the onboard regulator to the to the 12 to 6 volt regulator. If you are that concerned about power saving then use a switch mode regulator straight down to 5 volts and bypass the onboard regulator on the Arduino. For your phone charging I would suggest using 10 switch mode regulators with built in current limiting. You could also use a single one rated at 12 amps or more and fuse each output a 1 amp.

Les.

Hey Just checked the website again.. They say that Input Voltage (limits)6-20V , however the recommended input voltage is 7-12V and the operating voltage is 5V.. I'm trying to save power ... hopefully it works out. I'll look into switch mode regulators thanks
 

Thread Starter

Harshik

Joined Jan 13, 2017
8
Does the Arduino employ a linear voltage regulator IC?
If it does then your supply voltage has to exceed the 5V plus the drop-out voltage of the regulator.
Yes most probably as website states: Input Voltage (limits)6-20V,
Input Voltage (recommended) 7-12V,
Operating Voltage 5V
 

Thread Starter

Harshik

Joined Jan 13, 2017
8
You could use a switching regulator such as this for the 5 volts at 1 amp. (I am assuming you mean the 10 devices take a total of 1 amp.) I don't think that it would be worth using a switching regulator for the Arduino as it probably only takes a couple of hundred mA (You don't say which model of Arduino.) You could use a linear regulator such as an LM317 to generate the 6 volt supply. The coin acceptor could be fed directly from the 12 volts.

Les.
Hey when the battery is fully charge it can supply a voltage higher than 12V which will most definitely damage the coin acceptor. In which way could i limit the voltage supplied?
 
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