Storing ICs in the electronics labs

Thread Starter

engr_david_ee

Joined Mar 10, 2023
165
We usually order ICs little more then we need. For example if we need to solder one IC for a PCB then we normally order two or in some cases three ICs. As there are many ICs in PCB assembly, so we have always leftover ICs that we need to keep in the lab.

I am looking for vacuum packing machine that can pack and seal the ESD components with nitrogen filling or just do vacuum packing of antistatic bags.

Kindly give suggestions which vacuum packing machine can be considered to pack and seal the ESD components using antistatic bags.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
30,779
I have 10,000 components or more in storage. Some are in single quantities, many in more than 10 or even 100 pieces. Hence it is essential to have a very organized storage system.

I leave ICs in the antistatic bags or rails in which they were shipped. Single or small quantities are left in antistatic foam or antistatic component drawers. All components are tracked in an Excel database. I don’t vacuum pack them.

I do use a standard household food saver for sealing plastic bags for organizing other hardware such as nuts and bolts.
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
9,764
To reseal an antistatic bag, place a steel engineering rule over the open end, set your soldering iron to its minimum temperature, then scribe along the steel rule With the soldering iron. (then clean your soldering iron)
I don’t reseal them very often, I just try to open them with the smallest cut possible so the the contents doesn‘t fall out.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
13,231
You need some sort of storage system. Vidmar (type) drawers with anti-static bins and label plates work great for electronics and all small parts. I've never resealed parts that were stored in a industrial electronics workroom.
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or you can have, random access.
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Last edited:

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
2,193
Unless you're storing for the next millennium, most parts do not need to be stored in nitrogen or hermetically sealed. One of the better but lower cost methods I've worked with is a bunch of bin boxes holding rows of coin envelopes. Keep them organized, i.e. group 0402 resistors in order of value, then group 0804 resistors in order of value, etc.. then one box is for resistors, one for capacitors, etc.. now you can pick up a box and thumb through it and find what you need super quickly.

For repair kits or development for individual products, do this same basic idea but put all the parts for that specific product into one box. Now if you have to work on that product, grab that one box and you have every part for it.



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MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
30,779
I do not seal the bags. I store small quantities in the original anti-static bags in household plastic containers. I toss in a couple of silica gel packets.

parts storage.jpg

Note that silica gel packets that are shipped with the electronic components and also shoes, as well as the humidity sensor cards can be regenerated by leaving the the oven at low heat for about 1 hour.
 

Thread Starter

engr_david_ee

Joined Mar 10, 2023
165
Thanks for sharing your ideas and example of storing ICs. I actually have seen somewhere that removes the air from the anti static and then seal air tight. I guess this called hermetic sealed anti static bag. Any suggestion how I can find such the device. I am sorry I don't even know the proper name of the device but I have seen it some years ago and used once.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
16,896
I am looking for vacuum packing machine that can pack and seal the ESD components with nitrogen filling or just do vacuum packing of antistatic bags.
That's unnecessary unless you're going to store the parts for decades. I have parts that I acquired in the late 70's/early 80's and the only parts that have suffered are the ones stored in certain types of black antistatic foam.

Just store them in the original packing material and you should be good. Silica gel packs can help with humidity if you have them in sealed containers.

If this is for commercial products, you should follow manufacturer specifications.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
30,779
+1
The older style black carbon impregnated sponge is disaster for storing DIP packages. The carbon attracts moisture and the pins will corrode in a few short years. Get rid of this type of foam.
 

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
2,193
If you seal everything up, it will be a nightmare any time you want to use a part. Plus it's unnecessary. There are a few parts that require special storage, but they will come packaged in a way that makes this obvious, and the package will include moisture detection strips. And for those things I would just toss them in a zip lock with a silica bag, at the most. Unless they're million dollar parts or something.
 
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