Source transformation

Thread Starter

Aria Nemati

Joined Jul 19, 2019
8
I hate having sources in between resistors. Am I allowed to reposition the 10v power source and transform it into a current source ?

9F188559-0C1E-4892-A776-45B092D12829.jpeg
 
Usually you would want to use source transformation in more complex circuits. In the example you posted I don't see the need of converting a source into another. But answering your question, yes you can transform your voltage source into current source.
 

Thread Starter

Aria Nemati

Joined Jul 19, 2019
8
It’s a simple circuit, but it could be a part of a much bigger, complex circuit. I was unsure wether I was allowed to reposition the voltage source and replace the 3 and 6 ohm resistors with an equivalent resistor.

If I don’t reposition the voltage source. Are the two resistors still connected in parallel regardless of the voltage source in between?
 
Yes, those resistors are in parallel regardless of the voltage source between them. So you can just use an equivalent resistor. Take into account that to apply voltage source transformation, you must have the source in series with the resistor. To apply current source transformation, you must have the source in parallel with the resistor.

 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
24,688
It’s a simple circuit, but it could be a part of a much bigger, complex circuit. I was unsure wether I was allowed to reposition the voltage source and replace the 3 and 6 ohm resistors with an equivalent resistor.

If I don’t reposition the voltage source. Are the two resistors still connected in parallel regardless of the voltage source in between?
Consider the following circuit fragment from a netlist file:

R1 7 5 3
R2 7 5 6
V1 7 5 10

Each row contains a reference designator followed by two nodes that the device is attached to followed by the value of the device (ohms for resistors, volts for voltage sources).

Those three lines could appear anywhere within the netlist, in any order, separated by any number of other lines. All the matters, electrically, is which nodes the devices are connected to and what the value of the device is.

The same is true with your schematic, which is nothing more than a visual representation of a netlist. You can draw each device wherever and however you want provided it has the correct value and it connected to the correct nodes.

Any two (two-terminal) devices that connect to the same two nodes are in parallel since they have to have the same voltage across them at all times which is the very definition of components in parallel.
 
Top