Signal generator - max current draw

Thread Starter

ApacheKid

Joined Jan 12, 2015
385
I have an SDG1025 from Siglen.

I want to know what is the max current the outputs can sink, when driving say a small LED/resistor combo.

This is evident in the specs - am I missing something?

(It does mention that O/P can go up to 10 V and says "50 Ohm" so does that mean it could sink up to 200 mA (at that voltage) and be fine?)

Thanks
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
16,093
I have an SDG1025 from Siglen.

I want to know what is the max current the outputs can sink, when driving say a small LED/resistor combo.

This is evident in the specs - am I missing something?

(It does mention that O/P can go up to 10 V and says "50 Ohm" so does that mean it could sink up to 200 mA (at that voltage) and be fine?)

Thanks
That specification is more relevant to driving an AC load which is characterized by an impedance with a magnitude of 50 Ω.
For example an impedance of 35.35 + j35.35 has an impedance of 50 Ω with equal real and imaginary parts. The peak current in the real part of that impedance at 10 V is 0.283 Amperes.
This is not a continuous current DC specification. You can experiment but do so in a safe and controlled fashion.
25 mA is the specification on my signal generator.
 
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Thread Starter

ApacheKid

Joined Jan 12, 2015
385
That specification is more relevant to driving an AC load which is characterized by an impedance with a magnitude of 50 Ω.
For example an impedance of 35.35 + j35.35 has an impedance of 50 Ω with equal real and imaginary parts. The peak current in the real part of that impedance at 10 V is 0.283 Amperes.
This is not a continuous current DC specification. You can experiment but do so in a safe and controlled fashion.
25 mA is the specification on my signal generator.
Yes they didn't specify the nature of the 50 Ohm load, of course it could be a reactive load but they don't mention a power factor. It would help if there was a bit more clarity in the document.
 

KeithWalker

Joined Jul 10, 2017
1,778
The output impedance is 50 ohms. That means that when the output is connected to a 50 ohm load, the specified output voltage will be across the load. If you measure the output with an instrument that has a high input impedance, the output voltage will be twice the specified loaded output.
OP.jpg
 
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