Rewiring a motor from 110V to 220V

ApacheKid

Joined Jan 12, 2015
385
How do you rewire a motor from 110V to 220V?
Here is a photo of the motor and it’s wires:
I suspect this isn't possible/advisable. The gauge of the windings and number of windings as well as the speed are likely specific to the expected supply voltage and frequency.

I brought a Dyson over from the UK (50Hz 240V) to the US (60Hz 120V) and simply replaced the motor, actually modifying the motor strokes me as not the way to go...
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
22,823
I suspect this isn't possible/advisable. The gauge of the windings and number of windings as well as the speed are likely specific to the expected supply voltage and frequency.
The current at the higher voltage will be a lot less than the 120v.
The OP has not mentioned his location?
As a rule, AC induction motors are not precise devices.
In the case of the Dyson, it was most likely a Universal motor and is wound for one voltage.
Max.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
8,408
The picture of the tag shows exactly how to do it. The hard part will be determining which wires areT1, P1, , and P2. ALL the information that you need is in that picture. L1 and L2 are the supply lines. Just make sure to get all of the strands into the wire nuts.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
22,823
The picture of the tag shows exactly how to do it. The hard part will be determining which wires areT1, P1, , and P2. ALL the information that you need is in that picture. L1 and L2 are the supply lines. Just make sure to get all of the strands into the wire nuts.
If the motor is still connected in the high voltage mode, then it should be relatively simple to determine the 3 wires in question.
e.g. T1 would be the one tied to the Blue & red, all three taped off!
Max.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
8,408
The TS requested instructions to change from 120 volts to 220 volt operation. From that we can deduce that it was wired for the lower voltage. Examining the colors in the photo of the wires confirms this. So it s still needed to carefully determine which wires are P1, P2, and T1. If the motor is presently working on 120 volts then examination should make that obvious. It may also be that those three wires are labeled.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
8,408
This motor is VERY OBVIOUSLY an induction motor. That it is made by the Universal motor cooperative, a company that makes induction motors. In addition, the label, lits the type as SCS, a rather clear statement that it is not a brush type of motor. Beyond that, 1725 RPM is also a very good indication that it is an induction motor. So why even mention a DYSON motor?
 

ApacheKid

Joined Jan 12, 2015
385
The current at the higher voltage will be a lot less than the 120v.
The OP has not mentioned his location?
As a rule, AC induction motors are not precise devices.
In the case of the Dyson, it was most likely a Universal motor and is wound for one voltage.
Max.
I recall examining each motor, the 120v motor (the one I got from ebay) had thicker windings than the one I removed (240v UK), I assumed this was the case as it would draw approx twice the current to achieve the same overall power.

My recollection could be off of course.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
22,823
I recall examining each motor, the 120v motor (the one I got from ebay) had thicker windings than the one I removed (240v UK), I assumed this was the case as it would draw approx twice the current to achieve the same overall power.
In the case of a typical dual voltage AC induction motor, there is a change of windings from series for Hi voltage to parallel for low voltage.
Max.
 

ApacheKid

Joined Jan 12, 2015
385
In the case of a typical dual voltage AC induction motor, there is a change of windings from series for Hi voltage to parallel for low voltage.
Max.
Hmm, my motor knowledge has faded over the years, I now wonder if you're correct and I could have just fiddled with its existing motor!
 
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