Product Circuit Design

Thread Starter

Anna73

Joined May 4, 2020
6
Hi,
I am currently completing a project and require assistance with the electrical circuit design. Not sure if this is where to ask but currently unsure where else i can ask and I am clueless. I have supplied information below but I may have made mistakes.

The components required are:
Power supply (12V 2A), Arduino (thinking uno will be suitable), 5 LEDS, stepper motor (12V), CO2 Sensor (6V MG811), resistors and will require H bridge for motor I think.

The premise of the product is when the sensor detects a specified high level of CO2, the processor will turn on the motor for a set rotation to rotate a crank and switch on LEDS.
When CO2 decreases, the motor will rotate and reset to the original position and LEDs will switch off.

There is an option for the rotation to be staggered with the level of CO2. I.e 0 degrees = healthy, 90 degrees = moderate level, 180 = high. But, I do realize this complicates things and perhaps is more to do with coding.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. My aim is to create a schematic; however, this is very much out of my depth. Any quiestions let me know!
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
20,657
For a start, do you have any kind of Schematic capture program where you can draw a design and show the progress in recognized format?
There are several that are free, personally i use the free KiCad.
Max.
 

Thread Starter

Anna73

Joined May 4, 2020
6
For a start, do you have any kind of Schematic capture program where you can draw a design and show the progress in recognized format?
There are several that are free, personally i use the free KiCad.
Max.
Appologies, as I said I am very new to all this. I have do not have a schematic and my post was in hopes I could get some help to create one. I am struggling with even the simple wiring. I am a product design engineer and would like to gain an understanding of how the electronics of the product may work if I was to take it further.
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
13,711
My question is why do you need a motor to rotate a cam to turn LED on and off? Can't you just turn the LEDs on and off with the processor?
 

Thread Starter

Anna73

Joined May 4, 2020
6
My question is why do you need a motor to rotate a cam to turn LED on and off? Can't you just turn the LEDs on and off with the processor?
Oh sorry, my mistake. Its to power linkage in a plant simulator. LEDs illuminate the plant when the air is poor and mechanism moves leaves.
 

ElectricSpidey

Joined Dec 2, 2017
1,142
"The premise of the product is when the sensor detects a specified high level of CO2, the processor will turn on the motor for a set rotation to rotate a crank and switch on LEDS."

"The premise of the product is when the sensor detects a specified high level of CO2, the processor will turn on the motor for a set rotation to rotate a crank and also switch on LEDS."

See the difference?
 

KMoffett

Joined Dec 19, 2007
2,873
Anna73,
Are you familiar with programming an Arduino? There are tons of manuals and examples for attaching hardware. Start by sketching a Nano as a block. Then add the other components per examples on the internet. Come back with the sketch and let us help you.
Ken
 

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
1,775
Start with a flow chart. Make it very detailed. Include details, such as what level of CO2, and what exactly happens at each level. Is it battery powered? If yes, include what happens when the battery gets low, etc.. Once you have that you can start considering what parts you might need. As it is you don't have a clear definition for what your project is to do, so it's not a good idea to pick parts yet. It's likely you'll pigeonhole yourself if you pick parts first.

Make a proof of concept first, using off-the-shelf parts such as arduino boards and sensor breakout boards. Use that to test your theory before having custom electronics designed. A custom board is going to cost you some bucks, be sure you've got the details worked out before you pay for that.

On the surface it does not sound like a very complicated project for someone with experience. But the devil is always in the details, so be sure to spell out the details.
 
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