Nand Flash memory connectors repair

Thread Starter

rgalvim

Joined Nov 20, 2018
2
Hello everyone!

I am new to the world of electronics and, for one of my first projects, i was trying to repair one LCD TV that was sitting around. After some internet research and some testing, I figured that the problem was a faulty nand flash memory. So I bought one and went on for the replacement.

Surelly things didn't go well. In the process of removing the old memory, I ended up removing some of the connectors (I don't know the name of those, not sure if connectors is right) and now I'm guessing that I should:

1- Find a way to rebuild those connections;
2- Buy a new board, which is quite expensive.

20181120_230647.jpg

I am also uploading a picture of my artwork, so that you can see exactly what the problem is. My question is, is there a way to remake those connectors? Or is this a game over for this board?

Thanks for the help!
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
14,303
Welcome to AAC!

You've lifted pads. You'll need to find someone qualified to attempt a repair.

The next time you attempt a repair like that, practice on something that can be trashed. For TSOP parts, you should really use a hot air tool with an appropriate nozzle. Some low temp solder will help keep the solder molten longer.

The package next to it looks like BGA. That's not a DIY repair for most people. There's no way to visually inspect for bad solder joints.
 

Sensacell

Joined Jun 19, 2012
2,984
You have entered the twilight zone of board-level repair.

This board is now scrap, once the damage reaches this level, it's futile to try to fix the board.

Realize that these boards are NOT designed to be repaired, failure here is par for the course.
Re-work at this level is extremely difficult and requires specialized tools and lots of experience.

Most of the time it's not worth the effort, that's why people generally chuck stuff when it stops working.

It's a sad state of affairs for consumers and the environment.
 

spinnaker

Joined Oct 29, 2009
7,835
You have entered the twilight zone of board-level repair.

This board is now scrap, once the damage reaches this level, it's futile to try to fix the board.

Realize that these boards are NOT designed to be repaired, failure here is par for the course.
Re-work at this level is extremely difficult and requires specialized tools and lots of experience.

Most of the time it's not worth the effort, that's why people generally chuck stuff when it stops working.

It's a sad state of affairs for consumers and the environment.

I miss the old tube days. :(

Remember works in a drawer? That was the beginning of the end to component level repair I would say.
 

Thread Starter

rgalvim

Joined Nov 20, 2018
2
Ha, I knew I screwed up hard. But it's also good to know. At least it happened with an old TV. If that was my only one, I would be pretty mad at myself. I guess it's time to use this scrapboard to learn a bit more about circuits in general.

Thanks for the help everyone!
 
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