modify 5v power supply to pulse charge a smart phone battery

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
5,110
"pulse charge a smart phone battery"? I have no idea what you are asking? Can you define pulse charge? Smart phones I am familiar with you apply 5.0 VDC and the phone controls its charge.

Ron
 

Thread Starter

errol9536

Joined Jan 23, 2020
8
"pulse charge a smart phone battery"? I have no idea what you are asking? Can you define pulse charge? Smart phones I am familiar with you apply 5.0 VDC and the phone controls its charge.

Ron
Maybe no putting in the right term. The 5v supply puts a steady voltage into the battery.
My understanding is a charger gradually bring the voltage up to charge a battery. The protector board shuts down so the battery can't go to 100%. I but a diode in line but it slows the charge too much.
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
5,110
Modern cell phones Lithium Polymer and Lithium Ion batteries. Placing a forward biased diode inline will reduce the voltage by about .7 volts or a little less depending on the forward voltage drop of the diode.

Find out how to prolong battery life by using correct charge methods.

Take note where they mention:
"The so-called miracle charger that promises to prolong battery life and gain extra capacity with pulses and other gimmicks does not exist".

The 5v supply puts a steady voltage into the battery.
Not quite exactly. The 5.0 volt supply provides 5.0 volts to the battery charge circuit which controls the battery charge process.

Ron
 

dendad

Joined Feb 20, 2016
3,316
I would recommend you do not play around with the battery charging unless you want to blow the phone up.
The batteries used needs the correctly designed charger to charge well, and prevent fires.
The answer to your question is no!
 

Thread Starter

errol9536

Joined Jan 23, 2020
8
I would recommend you do not play around with the battery charging unless you want to blow the phone up.
The batteries used needs the correctly designed charger to charge well, and prevent fires.
The answer to your question is no!
Thanks
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
5,181
Certainly there is a way to add the pulse charging function but it needs a lot more than diodes. The smart pulse charger checks the voltage before starting the pulse, and then monitors the current during the pulse, and switches off when the current reaches some preset value. So the good pulse charger is not a simple device at all.
 

ci139

Joined Jul 11, 2016
1,177
the phone batteries their selves have a protection module integrated . . . the older ones of which limit the input current to 300mA ??? perhaps prevent the overcharging
http://www.cpkb.org/wiki/Nokia_BL-5K_battery_pinout
http://www.cpkb.org/wiki/Samsung_AB403450BU_battery_pinout
http://mobilephonehospital.blogspot.com/2011/11/type-of-mobile-phone-battery-and-about.html
▼https://electronics.stackexchange.com/posts/27691/revisions▼

. . .
_____________________
if you want to get started with Li-Ion charging you have (to find* and) to dig through a pile of *relevant papers . . . and do a lot of tests also on your own (assuming you have the electronics lab equipment required and skills to use it + setup your experiments so the data retrieved would be . . . meaningful) -- in many cases you save your time and money . . . even if you buy not the cheapest smart desktop phone battery charger or an extra phone that is known to have a good charger inside it
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
5,181
the phone batteries their selves have a protection module integrated . . . the older ones of which limit the input current to 300mA ??? perhaps prevent the overcharging
http://www.cpkb.org/wiki/Nokia_BL-5K_battery_pinout
http://www.cpkb.org/wiki/Samsung_AB403450BU_battery_pinout
http://mobilephonehospital.blogspot.com/2011/11/type-of-mobile-phone-battery-and-about.html
▼https://electronics.stackexchange.com/posts/27691/revisions▼

. . .
_____________________
if you want to get started with Li-Ion charging you have (to find* and) to dig through a pile of *relevant papers . . . and do a lot of tests also on your own (assuming you have the electronics lab equipment required and skills to use it + setup your experiments so the data retrieved would be . . . meaningful) -- in many cases you save your time and money . . . even if you buy not the cheapest smart desktop phone battery charger or an extra phone that is known to have a good charger inside it
At least the battery packs on my HP laptops have far more circuitry than shows in that simple block diagram. Both the battery pack and the charger are able to identify themselves as OEM devices, to the computer. Pulse charging may very well confuse things quite a bit. Pulse chargers DO WORK with lead acid batteries and there were some that worked with NiCad battery packs as well. But that is an older situation.
Now here is the important question: Exactly what does the TS expect to gain from such a different charging scheme? And what are the credentials of anyone claiming that the system that they sell does the job any better?
 
Top