Looking for a 7 position Rotary Switch that makes the connection between throws

Thread Starter

peteywhit

Joined Jun 4, 2018
3
First Post..

Like the title says, I am looking for a rotary switch that has 7 positions. I'm not looking for a single pole with 7 throws, but rather looking for a switch that shorts pins 1-2 then 2-3 then 3-4 then 4-5 then 5-6 then 6-7 then 7-8.

I can achieve what I want with two SP4T, and shorting the two poles together and then rotating each switch to select my position. But I want to see if there is a single switch to do what I want. So far, I've had no luck.

I've attached a drawing of what it looks like with two SP4T switches.

11-12 make A tap
12-13 make B tap
13-14 make C tap
14-15 make D tap
and so on....

Thanks for your help,
Blake
 

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ebp

Joined Feb 8, 2018
2,332
I've never encountered an off-the-shelf switch that would do that. You would have to make it from a 2P7+T switch, which you might find, but you might have to go to a "value added" distributor who will assemble it for you. You may be able to buy the pieces - "wafers" of SPxT and a shaft & detent assembly and build it yourself. If the switch has more positions than required, there is typically a stop that can be moved to limit to the required number of positions. An important question is the voltage and current rating required. It is likely to be quite expensive.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
20,652
Grayhill supply all kind of rotary switch with options of either Make before Break OR Break before Make rotary switches.
Max.
.
 

Thread Starter

peteywhit

Joined Jun 4, 2018
3
I've never encountered an off-the-shelf switch that would do that. You would have to make it from a 2P7+T switch, which you might find, but you might have to go to a "value added" distributor who will assemble it for you. You may be able to buy the pieces - "wafers" of SPxT and a shaft & detent assembly and build it yourself. If the switch has more positions than required, there is typically a stop that can be moved to limit to the required number of positions. An important question is the voltage and current rating required. It is likely to be quite expensive.
It'll never be more than 1A, and no more than 100VAC.

So in other words, you're saying to use a 2P7T switch and wire it like this?
Jump the 2nd and 3rd terminal, 4th and 5th, 6th and 7th of the first wafer, and then the 1st and 2nd, 3rd and 4th, 5th and 6th on the second wafer.

I mean that makes sense to me. Both ways solve my problem, but this one achieves it with 1 switch the way I would like.

Thanks for the help!
 

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