Light Emitting Wire

Thread Starter

cryptosaint777

Joined Jun 1, 2021
15
Hi,
I am an electronics hobbyist. I have noticed that a common and boring component the Light Emitting Diode has a specific voltage drop across it. For example, a red LED has a voltage drop of 1.7-2 vdc. This is interesting, because it is the same value for the energy of a red photon (1.7-2 electron volts). Perhaps it is possible to generate a specific color of light from a low voltage AC current. Any thoughts?
Currently I am working on constructing such a power source to test it.
 

andrewmm

Joined Feb 25, 2011
1,466
nope is the answer,

Leds work due to some sort of quantum , tunnel effect across a band gap ,
a specific junction size / type gives off a specific wave length

The brightness is proportional to the current, which is why leds need a current limit on the ( typically a resistor )

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light-emitting_diode

there are tri colour leds,
with separate wires for each led,
if we chose the r g b type led, then varying the current to each led changes the colour.
 

Thread Starter

cryptosaint777

Joined Jun 1, 2021
15
I am fairly certain it will work. I will be targeting 2.3 VAC at 300 mA. I will be generating a square wave with a 555 timer, which will activate a pair of zener diode voltage regulator circuits, one on an inverter, which will pulse at about 20khz through a ferrite core inductor with 3-5 turns.
 

andrewmm

Joined Feb 25, 2011
1,466
I am fairly certain it will work. I will be targeting 2.3 VAC at 300 mA. I will be generating a square wave with a 555 timer, which will activate a pair of zener diode voltage regulator circuits, one on an inverter, which will pulse at about 20khz through a ferrite core inductor with 3-5 turns.
we look forward to your results

what led are you using ?

BTW: if it does work, ensure you pattent it before you post in public
 

Thread Starter

cryptosaint777

Joined Jun 1, 2021
15
How does that explain the forward voltage of a high power LED that can easily reach 2.5 or more volts?
A white LED is 3 or more colors, the blue voltage drop is about 3.3 volts.

we look forward to your results

what led are you using ?

BTW: if it does work, ensure you pattent it before you post in public
Thank you for your encouragement. I will not be patenting anything, if someone else does it first that is okay.
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
3,308
There are AC currents of many voltages and frequencies going through a coil in every loudspeaker. Why don’t they produce light?

Bob
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
3,308
Actually there is light being emitted by any wire carrying current, you just can't see it.

IR

In fact......
Why dies it have to be carrying current? Any object that is not at absolute zero is emitting light.

And if the wire is carrying enough current it will emit visible light.

Bob
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
16,107
Hi,
I am an electronics hobbyist. I have noticed that a common and boring component the Light Emitting Diode has a specific voltage drop across it. For example, a red LED has a voltage drop of 1.7-2 vdc. This is interesting, because it is the same value for the energy of a red photon (1.7-2 electron volts). Perhaps it is possible to generate a specific color of light from a low voltage AC current. Any thoughts?
Currently I am working on constructing such a power source to test it.
Coincidence. There is no actual connection between a volt which is a measure of potential energy and an electron volt which is a measure of kinetic energy. So dividing kinetic energy by a standard velocity, usually the speed of light, gives units of momentum which is the usual context for the use of the electron volt. Your quest is both fruitless and pointless.
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
2,192
When an electron in a semiconductor
Certainly.
But the only way to get visible light from a wire is to run enough current through it so it heats up to incandescence (I think someone named Edison beat you to it :rolleyes:).
I think Joseph Swan was there first, but Humphrey Davy demonstrated incandescence in metal wires much earlier.
 

andrewmm

Joined Feb 25, 2011
1,466
Certainly.
But the only way to get visible light from a wire is to run enough current through it so it heats up to incandescence (I think someone named Edison beat you to it :rolleyes:).
the OP is looking for light from the LED, not the wire,
getting different colours from a red led by varying the voltage still wont change the colours ,
bu ti is the led,
 
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