Light Bulbs

Thread Starter

biferi

Joined Apr 14, 2017
46
I have a Ceiling Fan Fixture that takes 4. Light Bulbs.

So I put 4. 40 Watt LED Bulbs in it.

The Light is very Dull and the LED Bulbs do Say Soft White.

So I was going to go back to Incandescent Bulbs but I can not Find Long Lasting.

Then I Read that LEDs do put out UV Light but as we know so do Incandescent Bulbs.

I can only use 40 Watt Bulbs and I do a lot of Drawing.

Is Day Light White Brighter then Soft White and Worm White?

And should I still with LEDs?
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
23,071
A 40W equivalent consumes about 5W.
60W, about 9W.

The important thing to look for is the temperature.
Get 5000K for bright white or daylight.
 

Audioguru again

Joined Oct 21, 2019
2,854
I see 4000k as being bright white. 5000k appears blue (blue sky color?). I have never bought orange color "warm white" so I do not know its k numbers (2500k?).
 

Thread Starter

biferi

Joined Apr 14, 2017
46
Ok I do See 4,000k is Bright White.

But I See a lot of stuff that Says Day Light is not Bright White.
But when You Look for 4,000k it Says Day Light?
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
2,362
Ok I do See 4,000k is Bright White.

But I See a lot of stuff that Says Day Light is not Bright White.
But when You Look for 4,000k it Says Day Light?
Daylight is 5000K to 5500K, Bright White is a very good compromise because ~5000K is quite blue to the eye, particularly in cheaper LEDs with poorly formulated phosphor.
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
2,362
Buy the way, the color temperature is orthogonal to the output in lumens. The difference is color, not brightness. You might perceive one or another color temperature as "brighter" but that's a psychophysiological thing, not because of less flux from the lamp.
 

Thread Starter

biferi

Joined Apr 14, 2017
46
So if I want a good Bright White I will Look for 4,000k because 5,000k and up is more Blue Right?

And if I Buy a 40 Watt Equivalent LED Bulb if I get it in Say 4,000k it will be Righter to the Eye then a 40 Watt Equivalent LED Bulb that is 6,000k?

Am I Right?
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
2,362
So if I want a good Bright White I will Look for 4,000k because 5,000k and up is more Blue Right?

And if I Buy a 40 Watt Equivalent LED Bulb if I get it in Say 4,000k it will be Righter to the Eye then a 40 Watt Equivalent LED Bulb that is 6,000k?

Am I Right?
You do not want a 40W equivalent. LED bulbs produce a lot less heat, so more light per Watt. You can get 100W equivalents, which are only about 20W actual consumption (heat) and so will be cooler than 40W incandescent bulbs.

The 4000K lamps will be friendlier to your eyes than 5000K+ lamps.
 

AnalogKid

Joined Aug 1, 2013
9,042
So if I want a good Bright White I will Look for 4,000k because 5,000k and up is more Blue Right?

And if I Buy a 40 Watt Equivalent LED Bulb if I get it in Say 4,000k it will be Righter to the Eye then a 40 Watt Equivalent LED Bulb that is 6,000k?
Bottom line - it is all a matter of personal taste. As color temperature increases, so does the "blueness" of the perceived light. AND - your perception of the color of light changes throughout the day.

2850 (GE "Reveal" series incandescents) is noticeably a bit more blue than standard 2700 soft white. GE calls this a more "lively" light, and it is. Next up is my personal favorite, 3000. A bit more lively, still with a touch of the "warmer" tones, but not getting up into the very bright, daylight, harsh, and interestingly, "colder" light. For us, this is the lowest color temperature light that shows the true color of clothes. 4000 would be better, but we think that is a bit harsh for indoor area lighting. Above 3000, things get too blue for me.

ak
 

Thread Starter

biferi

Joined Apr 14, 2017
46
Ok I got it thanks for all the help.

But like I Say I do a lot of My Artwork Drawing in My Bedroom.

And My Ceiling Fixture takes 4. Bulbs.

I can not put 4. Bulbs and have every Bulb 100 Watts Equivalent.
This will be to Bright LOL.

Or do I not get what You are Telling Me?
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
17,030
You can find whatever lumen level you like. The equivalent to 40W is not enough and 100W is too much. Try 60W or 75W equivalents. You could also leave one or two out but they may not look great
 

eetech00

Joined Jun 8, 2013
2,292
Ok I got it thanks for all the help.

But like I Say I do a lot of My Artwork Drawing in My Bedroom.

And My Ceiling Fixture takes 4. Bulbs.

I can not put 4. Bulbs and have every Bulb 100 Watts Equivalent.
This will be to Bright LOL.

Or do I not get what You are Telling Me?
when you shop for the LED bulb, look closely at the specifications. There should be text somewhere on the label that states something like:

Energy used: 6 Watts (replaces 40 Watts)
 

Thread Starter

biferi

Joined Apr 14, 2017
46
Thanks for all the help.

But one more thing and I do not know if anybody can help Me?

I know Incandescent Bulbs have all the Colors in the White Light.
And Yes they give Off UV Light.

Everything I Read Says LEDs give Off more UV then Incandescent Bulbs.

Then I See how LEDs are Bad for the Eyes.
And LEDs give Off a lot of Blue Light witch keeps You Up.

I can not Find one Web Page that Tals good about LED Bulbs.

Now I do know LED Bulbs are the new Tech. so they will Tell You everything Good about LEDs.
And Incandescent Bulbs are the Older Tech. so LEDs will Tell You everything Bad about Incandescent Bulbs?

Is there any Truth to anything Bad about LEDs?
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
17,030
Don’t worry about it. The amount of UV from LED lighting is trivial compared to even a few minutes of sunlight. Imagine a top ten list of daily risks: car accidents, poor lifestyle choices, pandemics and so on. LED lighting is not on that list.
 

Audioguru again

Joined Oct 21, 2019
2,854
I think a cheap white LED produces a fairly good total of colors. It is basically a blue LED with a yellow-orange phosphor.
A more complicated white LED has red, green and blue LEDs together. These primary colors add to produce many other colors.
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
2,362
Would 5,000 k be Sun Light on a Clear Day?
5000K is the standard for noon daylight. It is used for observing colors for standard matching. It is a bit tough on the eyes when used for a long time but can be helpful in task lighting. A lot of new task lights have bi-color LED arrays to allow for 5000K when needed and something "warmer" when not.

Ironically, it is actually cooler but we call things with more red and less blue "warm". The 5000K refers to the color of radiation from a black body heated to that temperature, cooler temperatures have red and yellow.
 
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