Is there junk market in your country?

Discussion in 'Marketplace' started by UnnamedUser159, Apr 3, 2018.

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  1. UnnamedUser159

    Thread Starter Member

    May 3, 2016
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    I am located in Bulgaria and here once at week gypsys and other guys sell some stuff at one place.

    The products are most probably from trash, from cleaning basements and maybe stollen.

    Does in your country exists such market? (maybe better answer if yes)

    Nice day;
     
  2. jpanhalt

    Expert

    Jan 18, 2008
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    In the US, they are often called flea markets. The connection with "junk" (items you don't need or necessarily want) should be obvious. But, not everything is junk.
     
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  3. AlbertHall

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jun 4, 2014
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    We (UK) have car boot sales (similar to the flea market I think) but there is also Freecycle.
    Here you can get rid things you don't want and get things you do want but everything is free - whoever wants the item collects it.
    I have quite a few items which were on freecycle as not working but which I have mended.
     
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  4. RichardO

    Senior Member

    May 4, 2013
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    Here in the US we also have garage and yard sales where an individual will sell his unused stuff at his/her house. Sometimes an entire neighborhood will get together and have all their sales on the same day.
     
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  5. Willen

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    Nov 13, 2015
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    I love surplus market! No such junk/surplus market here in Nepal otherwise I would go weekly there. :)
     
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  6. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    One thing that's fun here in the U.S. is garage sales or even trash day in rich neighborhoods. I knew of families that would buy a new snow shovel every winter and throw it away in the spring. That is just one tiny example of the wasteful behavior that one can benefit from. You can find LCD monitors, not-so-old computers, nice furniture, all kinds of things, if you take the time to look.

    To paraphrase Thoreau, we are rich in proportion to what we can afford to throw away.
     
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  7. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    Better yet, we have RRFM (Really, Really Free Market) where everything is free.

    upload_2018-4-5_13-26-10.jpeg
     
  8. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    Here it's the "curb alerts" listed in the local craigslist. I start every day with a quick scan of the new stuff listed. It's useless 95+% of the time, but I've scored some nice furniture and my table saw all for free.
     
  9. Willen

    Member

    Nov 13, 2015
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    Why they spend their time by giving free stuff in free market? Interesting!
     
  10. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    In many cases the “cost” of setting a price, haggling over it, changing money and all that just isn’t worth the bother. Personally I just like knowing something may get some use again before it’s sent to the dump. I always find it hard to throw something out that’s still basically the same as it was new. Much more satisfying to give it away.
     
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  11. MrChips

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    Oct 2, 2009
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    The answer is simple. There is much more to human existence than exchanging goods for money. It is what we do to help each other along the way on life's journey that is more important. It is what we share with each other, what we can give without any thought of receiving.

    Money is artificial. It is a creation of human society. Being able to give away something has more meaning, purpose and satisfaction. Try it and you will discover the joys of paying it forward.

    This is exactly what we do each and every day on AAC if you have not already recognized it.

    If you would like to learn more about this, google "gift economy" or read Charles Eisenstein's Sacred Economics.

    http://sacred-economics.com/sacred-economics-chapter-16-transition-to-gift-economy/
     
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  12. Reloadron

    Distinguished Member

    Jan 15, 2015
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    Yes and as mentioned in the US we call it a "flea market" or "swap meet". They range from a few tables to thousands of tables in large buildings or a large land mass. Some are well focused on for example on automotive parts or motorcycle parts while some are just general everything you can imagine. Anyway all very common. Lately I have also seen free stuff, especially clothing like coats for kids. Need a coat? Take a coat. Have a coat? Give a coat. You get the idea.

    Ron
     
  13. KeepItSimpleStupid

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 4, 2014
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    Sometimes it's also known as a "white elephant sale"
     
  14. AlbertHall

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jun 4, 2014
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    I'd rather have some white elephants than fleas.
     
  15. Janis59

    Active Member

    Aug 21, 2017
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    RE:""Does in your country exists such market?""
    Yes.
    In Latvia we call it Latgalite market, working everyday except mondays.
    In England its called car-boot-sales, happening every week but changing the place.
    In Germany, it happens too, every sunday.
    In russia it happened underground, and seems still happens.
    In Ukraina ir happens rather openly, now.
    In Poland it was grand and everywhere at the nineties, so today it has to be diminished, but sure still happens.
    Even in Belorussia it happens in specific place near Minsk, everyday.
     
  16. DickCappels

    Moderator

    Aug 21, 2008
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    There are numerous small shops in Bangkok that sell both new, surplus, and used parts and equipment. You can find nearly anything around the Banmoh Plaza area if you are persistent. I had been looking for some leaded 1% and 5% resistors for nearly a year and was finally directed to a shop here. By the way, the prices are often much less than North American distributor price. The 5% resistors were about US$0.0033 each while the 1% resistors were about US$0.005 each in thousands. In hundreds they are a tiny bit more.

    upload_2018-6-3_20-2-54.png
    That's my little brother looking at one of the small shops in Bahnmo Plaza last week.
     
  17. KeepItSimpleStupid

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 4, 2014
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