Is 115 volt a single breaker or 220. And something with a 208 volts only work on three phase. Or

Thread Starter

Paul Bender

Joined Feb 12, 2018
4
Is 115 volt a single breaker. And is 208 volts just for3 phase elec. Or can it be hooked up with a double220 breaker. I'm in usa
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
19,006
208v between phases is usually for a 120v each phase to neutral for L.V. distribution.
Not sure of the breaker question, the voltage can be 120v/240 the critical thing is the current rating.
A single breaker in a N.A. residential panel is 120v.
Max.
 
There are 208 V and 240 V single and 3 phase systems. Residential (USA) is typically 240/120 single phase (sometimes called split-phase).

Sometimes, systems will operate on 208-240 without issues, sometimes you have to re-configure the device or replace parts.
240 V diffusion pumps won;t work well on 208 V. They have a heating element running at full power with an over-temperature cut-out.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
19,006
There are also motors designed to run on 208 3ph to cater to the industrial and farm applications that are using 208 3ph now.
Max.
 

Thread Starter

Paul Bender

Joined Feb 12, 2018
4
208v between phases is usually for a 120v each phase to neutral for L.V. distribution.
Not sure of the breaker question, the voltage can be 120v/240 the critical thing is the current rating.
A single breaker in a N.A. residential panel is 120v.
Max.
It reads 115 volts. 60 hz. Ph 1 f.i.amps 13.2. Its a frezer
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
3,861
If you are adding a separate circuit breaker just for a freezer,I can offer a useful suggestion. Add a line-powered clock to the same circuit, in some place where it will be easily seen. The reason is that the clock will serve as a power monitor for the freezer power, so if the clock starts showing the wrong time you will know to check for the problem before the freezer thaws and food is ruined. I did this with my freezer and it has saved from a disaster twice.
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
3,577
A single breaker will have a single switch. Double breakers have double switches that are tied together with (usually) an aluminum bar between them so that they both are tripped if one of the two legs see excessive current. Typical double breakers can be found on electric dryers, electric ovens/ranges, electric water heaters. The typical (US 120 VAC system) is 15 or 20 amp breakers, single pole (single switch). 120 VAC is derived from a center tapped (split) 240 VAC power source. The tap is the neutral line. Each leg to neutral is 120 VAC. Leg to leg is 240 VAC.
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
3,577
If you are adding a separate circuit breaker just for a freezer,I can offer a useful suggestion. Add a line-powered clock to the same circuit, in some place where it will be easily seen. The reason is that the clock will serve as a power monitor for the freezer power, so if the clock starts showing the wrong time you will know to check for the problem before the freezer thaws and food is ruined. I did this with my freezer and it has saved from a disaster twice.
Digital clocks I'm familiar with operate by counting the number of cycles per second to derive their time. Most are not very accurate. And if there's a drain on the system it still doesn't affect the cycles per second. Voltage may drop but the frequency (60Hz) will remain constant. (relatively speaking)
 

shortbus

Joined Sep 30, 2009
6,976
A single breaker will have a single switch. Double breakers have double switches that are tied together with (usually) an aluminum bar between them so that they both are tripped if one of the two legs see excessive current.
Kind of have to disagree with that statement. I have some that are two 120V in the place a single 220V would be taking up. Both are breakers are only using one pole of the buss bar, and react separately.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
3,861
Digital clocks I'm familiar with operate by counting the number of cycles per second to derive their time. Most are not very accurate. And if there's a drain on the system it still doesn't affect the cycles per second. Voltage may drop but the frequency (60Hz) will remain constant. (relatively speaking)
I was suggesting an older style mechanical clock, one of those with a motor and gears. They are much less sensitive to transient power disturbances and very short outages. For this application a digital clock is a poor choice, and a battery powered clock is totally worthless as a power monitor device.
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
3,577
Kind of have to disagree with that statement. I have some that are two 120V in the place a single 220V would be taking up. Both are breakers are only using one pole of the buss bar, and react separately.
I have those too. The double breakers are the ones with bars between the switches.

I removed a 30 amp 240 double breaker and replaced it with two 20 amp single breakers. What's more, they have double breakers (not double trip breakers) to gain more utility space in my panel. Those too are individual breakers, they just take up the space one older style breaker took up. However, they still share the same leg of the circuit. You CAN'T get 240 out of them.
 
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