Identifying Unmarked Transformer

Thread Starter

Blockman301

Joined Jun 29, 2020
2
Hello, I'm currently attempting to reverse engineer a PCB from my '88 Nissan 300ZX. This particular PCB is the power supply for the dash gauges. There are two components labeled T1 and T2 which I'm assuming are power transformers. Neither of them contain a part number on them so identifying them is not so easy. By using a reference ground to the chassis of the car i obtained the voltage values below when the car is on. By measuring resistance, I kinda sorta got an idea of it is wound. This is what I've come up with so far and some guidance as to how to identify and find a replacement for these transformers would be great! Thanks so much!

IMG_1856.jpgIMG_1857.jpgIMG_1858.jpg
 

Irving

Joined Jan 30, 2016
404
They are almost certainly proprietary - it's very unlikely you'll find a source. Why do you think they need replacing?

If the board is faulty there are specialist companies that repair dashboard modules, they may be able to offer insight. Else it's a replacement pcb from a breaker.
 

Thread Starter

Blockman301

Joined Jun 29, 2020
2
They are almost certainly proprietary - it's very unlikely you'll find a source. Why do you think they need replacing?

If the board is faulty there are specialist companies that repair dashboard modules, they may be able to offer insight. Else it's a replacement pcb from a breaker.
They do not need replacing. My dash works correctly. I thought I might try to reverse engineer it in order to create a duplicate. These going out are very common on this type of car and I wanted try to make a second one Incase mine fails. I thought I might be able to find a similar transformer.
 

Irving

Joined Jan 30, 2016
404
The best solution then is to get a dead one and carefully disassemble it to see how many windings & turns per winding so you can rewind it. if they fail that often it shouldn't be hard to find one and those E-I cored, bobbin wound units are usually fairly easy to strip down.

Option 2 is to reverse engineer the complete power supply element regarding input/output voltages & currents by measuring a good board at the appropriate places, and create a standalone off-board version using a modern controller IC.
 
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