I need help for timer

Thread Starter

Dzoro

Joined Feb 1, 2019
137
Hello guys i need a circuit timer that is going to give 1 volts for 10 minutes every hour how that can be achived.Thanks

Dzoro
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
3,556
We need more specifics: How many amps? How accurate do you need the time control to be? What is your source of voltage?
 

oz93666

Joined Sep 7, 2010
661
Such timers are called Infinite cycle , put that term in eBay search and you get a dozen different types around $3 inc delivery ...

In this diagram the relay (big blue thing) is used to switch mains but you will put your 1V power there ... you also need another voltage supply ( 5/12/24) to run the device.
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
3,556
@oz93666 One question that has not been answered yet is how much current does the thread starter want to switch? From what I can see it looks like the relay may be rated for 10 amps. That may well be all the TS wants to control. But if they're controlling a higher amperage then this unit will not work.

Has the TS responded to any of our questions since posting this thread?
 
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oz93666

Joined Sep 7, 2010
661
@oz93666 One question that has not been answered yet is how much current does the thread starter want to switch? From what I can see it looks like the relay may be rated for 10 amps. That may well be all the TS wants to control. But if they're controlling a higher amperage then this unit will not work.
Also what is he going to do with that 1 Volt ??? Seems very strange ...
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
4,498
I would start with a Google of "Repeat Cycle Relay Timer" or as also mentioned "Infinite Cycle Relay Timer". Since you want different On and Off times make sure what you get allows that and also as mentioned that the relay can handle your load. Personally I would likely buy a turn key off the shelf solution rather than build but that's your call. Depending on the application the inexpensive solutions from China work fine or if you have a harsh industrial environment (and deep pockets) you can look to manufacturers like Dayton, Macromatic, NTE and others which are packaged in an 8 or 11 pin base package or DIN Rail mounting packages.

A better full description of your objective would go a longer way in finding the best solution.

Ron
 

Thread Starter

Dzoro

Joined Feb 1, 2019
137
Sorry that i didnt replay i dont know why i am not geting notifications

So i will supply 12volts the current should be enough to switch a transistor i need this circuit to power 3 dc motors
 

Thread Starter

Dzoro

Joined Feb 1, 2019
137
So to explain what i need the circuit for
I am making an incubator for hatching eggs for a costumer and he wants the egg to be rotating and some indicators for the humidity tank of water with pump to fill it when the tank is half way used some sprays of water to be sprayed 3 times a day but i have every thing just i need a circuit for controling the dc motors
And i have a circuit to controll the temerature at exactly 37.5 celsius and the eggs need to be rotated multiple times every hour so the costumer dont have time to do that every day so i will put 3 dc motors and i need a circuit to switch them for 10 minutes every hour so that would be 10 minutes on 50 minutes off and so on i have electronic knowlege enough to design a circuit but i dont have time beacose i am reapiring amplifiers and some inverters i have a work shop i have lots of parts ics resistors capacitors and so on every electric hobist knows i have timers op amps everithing i need but i dont have chematic.
I saw the cd4060 datasheet its perfect for that and i have it in my workshop so i would apreciate if someone can send me a chematic with that ic and also it doesnt need to be too accurate and it doesnt matter if the output is 1 volt it can be up to 5 just so i can be able to switch a transistor and than a relay for the higher current of the motors
Thanks
Dzoro
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
3,847
OK, so the ten minutes of each hour only needs to switch on a power transistor. The cheapest and most reliable way will be to use a binary divider driven by the AC line frequency. Probably two IC devices unless the decoding the time gets complicated. divide by 3600 to get one pulse per minute, then another counter counts up to 50 and switches an output on, and a different counter counts to ten and switches it off, and resets both counters to zero. Or if the line frequency is 50 hZ then divide by 3000 to get one pulse per minute. And one more counter for tens of minutes, switch on at a count of 5 , switch off and reset at a count of six.
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
4,498
This has come up before. Now while I have never hatched an egg my understanding is that they should be rotated only three to five times per day or roughly every 5 to 8 hours. That within a controlled temperature and humidity environment as you mentioned. You start something like a few days after a fertilized egg is laid and stop after something like about 18 days which should be about 3 days before the chicks hatch. Rotation consist of rotating the egg 180 degrees lengthwise and some hatchers mark the eggs on one side so at a glance they know if all the eggs are rotated evenly. Be sure of your timing requirements. As I mentioned I never hatched an egg but have seen this subject come up before.

A simple Google of "CD4060 timer circuits" will bring up dozens of hits including schematics. If I were to do this using discrete components I would likely just use a micro-controller and be done with it. I would use a single motor with a cog belt drive to rotate a few lengths of PVC tubing which the eggs would rest on. Using a 4060 I would just have my pulse out at given time intervals drive a one shot to drive my motor using a MOSFET. Whatever time duration to rotate my eggs 180 degrees. Similar to hot dog roasting machines work. That's about the best I can explain the design. :)

Really for a timer I would use a uC (micro-controller) or for a project like this, depending on how many eggs per load I would just buy an repeat interval timer like I mentioned earlier. This saves you building and designing a circuit board.

Ron
 

danadak

Joined Mar 10, 2018
3,569
And i have a circuit to controll the temerature at exactly 37.5
How exactly, what is the error you can live with ?

The three motors, each with their own timing or all come on in parallel ?

The tank level, indicator, you want that displayed as a numeric or bar graph or......?
You already have a sensor for that, if so part number ?

Lastly timing accuracy needed ?


Regards, Dana.
 

Wolframore

Joined Jan 21, 2019
1,242
It’s for hatching eggs the built in RC oscillator would work fine for the purpose. That’s what makes the chip so useful.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
3,847
A micro controller must be programmed and then if a duplicate is needed that must also be programmed. And will that same device be available in a year?? Often not. But the CD4060 has been around for over 20 years and will undoubtedly be available for many more, because it is still useful. Plus, anybody can look at the circuit and understand exactly what it will do. That is seldom true with programs on a micro. Also, that CD4060 is available from a number of manufacturers, while almost all microcontrollers are single sourced.
 

danadak

Joined Mar 10, 2018
3,569
Intel 8051, still around, and many derivatives 1981 -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_MCS-51

Mostly derivatives available.


ATTINY Familiy introduction 1999 -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ATtiny_microcontroller_comparison_chart


Micros generally are good for 8 - 10 years. Look at the 8051 introduced in 1981.
Some companies made derivatives, some still offering both core and parts. Often
the family survives but not specific parts.

For sure there are micros that have had shorter lifespan. That being said
many have stuck around if they "caught" on with design community like
MSP430 (1993) -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TI_MSP430

Micros tend to follow demand, if they fall out of favor that sounds their death rattle. Same
for logic families. RTL, DTL totally gone. Most ECL. Several CMOS families under
pressure for termination. Its all about demand, price, process......and sometimes
strategic considerations. Fab for a particular geometry simply no longer supportable.

As far as code readability, depends on the programmer. Some write a novel worth of
comments into their code. others nothing, and everything in between.


Regards, Dana.
 

danadak

Joined Mar 10, 2018
3,569
It’s for hatching eggs the built in RC oscillator would work fine for the purpose. That’s what makes the chip so useful.
Having worked on an egg farm much of the production is a scheduled process, and time of
day is part of the equation. So I would be curious what their goal is for accuracy. An RC as we
all know can have some pretty bad tolerances, cap, Amp, T, V.....Do they need ppm resolution
and accuracy, I would bet not. But 100's of percent, can they live with that......maybe thats a
problem.


Regards, Dana.
 

Wolframore

Joined Jan 21, 2019
1,242
It’s 10% +/- depending on the tolerance of your timing components. I always put in a potentiometer to fine adjust for final application. It sounds like the temperature shouldn’t vary too much since it’s a warming device. If you’re that concerned you can put an oscillator on it. You can have ppm resolution

upload_2019-9-1_17-34-2.gif
 
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