How to build project with hookwire

Thread Starter

quique123

Joined May 15, 2015
389
I want to build this circuit that I had on a breadboard.

BBA53C0B-ED58-4941-BF3B-D4C78A198645.png

So I placed my components on a perfboard like so:

174F928D-DABF-4098-9428-E3C18245543F.png

But I had issues with components getting in the way, and not taking into account wires going over others which made it harder to measure the right length and connections that I would have to make like a T where a wire intersects and must connect to a perpendicular wire as it goes over it and continues to another connection point:

9A53F078-3554-4ADB-9159-28D5FFFADC9E.png

Could I get pointers on using hook wire to make connections. Issues like how to place components in ideal positions, how to measure and run hook wire for connecting points A and B but also allowing for a midwire connection point C...

Thanks
 

SLK001

Joined Nov 29, 2011
1,543
You're on the right track. Sometimes you need to spread out connections to more than one plated thru hole. You might want to get you some wire-wrapping wire - it is a much smaller gauge and you can put more than one wire thru each hole.
 

TeeKay6

Joined Apr 20, 2019
556
I want to build this circuit that I had on a breadboard.

View attachment 187236

So I placed my components on a perfboard like so:

View attachment 187237

But I had issues with components getting in the way, and not taking into account wires going over others which made it harder to measure the right length and connections that I would have to make like a T where a wire intersects and must connect to a perpendicular wire as it goes over it and continues to another connection point:

View attachment 187238

Could I get pointers on using hook wire to make connections. Issues like how to place components in ideal positions, how to measure and run hook wire for connecting points A and B but also allowing for a midwire connection point C...

Thanks
@quique123
You might look at these. I have no further info and have never used any of these.
https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/p/drawingboard-pro/9wzdncrdnjsh?activetab=pivot:overviewtab
https://www.electroschematics.com/veroboard-design-software/
https://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/1600/stripboard-veroboard-matrix-board-design-software
 

Sensacell

Joined Jun 19, 2012
2,544
It just takes some experience, keep building!
You will get the hang of grouping parts and wires to look nice and solder quick and easy.

I use bare tinned copper # 24AWG and very fine Teflon tubing.

The Teflon doesn't melt, so you don't have to worry about melted insulation when soldering
It's much easier to clip a bit of tube and slide it over a wire than wrestling with wire strippers.
 

atferrari

Joined Jan 6, 2004
3,628
I want to build this circuit that I had on a breadboard.

View attachment 187236

So I placed my components on a perfboard like so:

View attachment 187237

But I had issues with components getting in the way, and not taking into account wires going over others which made it harder to measure the right length and connections that I would have to make like a T where a wire intersects and must connect to a perpendicular wire as it goes over it and continues to another connection point:

View attachment 187238

Could I get pointers on using hook wire to make connections. Issues like how to place components in ideal positions, how to measure and run hook wire for connecting points A and B but also allowing for a midwire connection point C...

Thanks
Using the same type of board as you, a quite simple trick: wires running horizontally, all on one side, those vertically on the opposite.

In the beginning when drawing the mimic diagram prior wiring, use different colors for them.

I prefer veroboard; it helps to visualize things much more easily to me.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
8,459
I buy solderable breadboards (as in previous 2 posts) that are laid out the same or almost as conventional breadboards and 24 AWG Kynar solid wire. Easy to strip. Fine enough to make small bends, and insulation doesn't burn back and look ugly. I also use thin Teflon tubing for insulating long leads, such a resistors. For layout, I use an early version of Eagle. That allows easy parts placement and changes plus schematic capture. Here's an example of my WWVB receiver:

upload_2019-10-3_5-28-6.png
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
19,912
As others have said, try using different prototyping boards and wire sizes. Looks like you are using 22AWG wire which is too course.

Strip board, or Vero board, with parallel runs are easier to route with discrete components.
Also boards with 0.3" IC pads are easy too when using many ICs.

Try 30AWG wirewrap wire.
 

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
1,648
If the circuit is to be temporary, just building it to see if it works, you'll save a ton of time using a friction fit breadboard instead of soldering all the wires. It's also easier to make changes. If you start messing with things that have digital signals or clocks, such as SPI, I2C, .. or sensitive analog stuff like ADC then the friction fit can be a little finicky as the connections aren't quite as good, but for general testing things out they're handy:

https://www.kr4.us/breadboard-giant.html
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
1,621
I bought one of those plated quadruple breadboards and have never used it. Mostly use the 400 pin "half-boards" and the occasional 830 pin "full-boards". Once or twice used 2 "full-boards" and thought about buying a plated double board but it would just gather dust as the plated 4 board one does. I keep some perf-boards in the drawer for when I want to solder something and thought about buying some of the solderable "breadboards" but seems like a lot of wasted space although they do look handy. Might buy some one day. I still have my "antique" wire wrap stuff but out of the pins although I could use some header strips.
 
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