Help: Modern Timer

Thread Starter

ayuta

Joined Apr 3, 2020
3
Hello,

I am making a light that turns on when you push a button and turns off after couple of seconds.
I have looked online and there are many video available showing you how to do that.

The only issue I keep running into is that most of the videos and article use 555 timer, which is an old IC, they are not currently used in modern devices.

I want to know what do modern devices use as timer. Is there a popular IC or SMT component that used ?

Thank you
 

Marley

Joined Apr 4, 2016
411
555 is still an IC in current production. In fact I think one of the most successful ICs of all time!
The up to date way of doing this is with a small 8-pin microcontroller because it gives you far more functionality for the same component cost.
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
3,185
Why would you want to use an expensive component when a cheap one does the same job? The 555 timer is arguably the most sold IC ever made and still used. Learning it is easy and easy to implement. Get the PDF and read it and play with one to learn what it can do. Not only as a timer but also as an oscillator. Worth the time and effort. YMMV
 

Thread Starter

ayuta

Joined Apr 3, 2020
3
555 is still an IC in current production. In fact I think one of the most successful ICs of all time!
The up to date way of doing this is with a small 8-pin microcontroller because it gives you far more functionality for the same component cost.
Thank you for the reply. I have seen website such as Digikey and Mouser selling them.
What 8 pin microcontroller would you recommend? would be something like Atmega328 ?

It is for industrial use and will be used for a whole day everyday.
 

Thread Starter

ayuta

Joined Apr 3, 2020
3
Why would you want to use an expensive component when a cheap one does the same job? The 555 timer is arguably the most sold IC ever made and still used. Learning it is easy and easy to implement. Get the PDF and read it and play with one to learn what it can do. Not only as a timer but also as an oscillator. Worth the time and effort. YMMV
Thank you for the reply.

The device I am making is for industrial use and will be used for longer period of time. I need something more suitable for modern time and can handle constant use.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
12,678
Welcome to AAC!
The only issue I keep running into is that most of the videos and article use 555 timer, which is an old IC, they are not currently used in modern devices.

I want to know what do modern devices use as timer. Is there a popular IC or SMT component that used ?
Just because it's an old design, that doesn't mean it's obsolete. It's still widely available from many sources.
 

LesJones

Joined Jan 8, 2017
3,088
I have done a similar thing to what you describe. It uses a Attiny13a (8 pin device.) It does a bit more than you describe as it is designed to run of batteries. It draws almost no current when the light is off as the Attiny13a is powered off when the light is off. It also monitors the battery voltage and flashes a led when the battery needs charging. It also switches off if the battery voltage gets too low. If this is of interest to you I can post the schematic and the code to run on the Attiny13a. You would probable need to modify the code to make it behave exactly the way you want.

Les.
 

Marley

Joined Apr 4, 2016
411
The device I am making is for industrial use and will be used for longer period of time. I need something more suitable for modern time and can handle constant use.
Although a 555 is an interesting device and a good place for a beginner to start learning about electronics, for a modern design (especially for quantity production) a small micro-controller is definitely better. A 555 is cheap but needs extra components especially for long time values: a large capacitor, high value resistor(s) and suffers with poor accuracy.

A micro-controller (as mentioned above) will have an accurate on-chip oscillator, pull-ups on its inputs, etc. so hardly any extra components are needed. Long time delays are no problem. Reset on power-up? No problem. Want to de-bounce a button? No problem. Count button presses or distinguish between short and long presses? No problem.

Want to change the function? Just re-program. Longer on the initial design phase (for program development) but smaller BOM, more flexibility.
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
26,762
I need something more suitable for modern time and can handle constant use.
It's likely that a 555 is more reliable than any more complex circuit such as a microcontroller, but either should be reliable enough for constant use.
How is being "modern" better?
The 555 is perfectly acceptable if it performs the desired function.
 
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