getting start with java programming

Thread Starter

Parth786

Joined Jun 19, 2017
642
Hi everyone

I have started to learn java programming. I have downloaded eclipse IDE on my Laptop and I am doing practice by writing programs. I have been studying some basics fundamental of java programming such as data type, print, scanner class,if else, while loop, for loop , enum, switch case statement's. I have been written java programs for arithmetic operation and still reading the some basics.

I am following this link https://www.javatpoint.com/java-tutorial

I want to learn embedded java programming. I have seen mostly when ever we write embedded program we just use basic fundamentals like data type, if else, for loop, while loop, array, pointer, enum, switch case, structure in c programming. I have seen them being the most used till now. in embedded programming we write program for embedded device such as sensor, Lcd, GPS..etc

I need help getting start step by step with java programming. I don't know what to do next so, Please tell me How to do further planning.

Note : I know, I should follow books and links, which I am following but I thought this question should be asked here because beginning should be start in right way.
 
Last edited:

be80be

Joined Jul 5, 2008
1,963
Looks like the the link you posted covers that
Java Tutorial or Core Java Tutorial or Java Programming Tutorial is a widely used robust technology. Let's start learning Java from basic questions like what is Java tutorial, Core Java, where it is used, what type of applications are created in Java, why use java and Java platforms etc. Our Java tutorial helps you to learn Java with easy and simple examples.
 

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
1,616
One option for practicing real world type java programming; once you have the fundamentals down, grab a cheap android cell phone or tablet and free android studio and write write some apps. A phone will have a GPS, sound device, camera, screen, Bluetooth radio, etc.. Lots of toys to play with.
 

Thread Starter

Parth786

Joined Jun 19, 2017
642
One option for practicing real world type java programming; .
That's a very good suggestion. I am scared of learning a lot at same time, I do not have even good knowledge of a single language.
Learning without a class is also a difficult task while subject is outside of your domain area. But I will try my best

sometime it feels like I will do it but sometime it feels like I will not be able to do this
 

spinnaker

Joined Oct 29, 2009
7,837
That's a very good suggestion. I am scared of learning a lot at same time, I do not have even good knowledge of a single language.
Learning without a class is also a difficult task while subject is outside of your domain area. But I will try my best

sometime it feels like I will do it but sometime it feels like I will not be able to do this

How is it possible to graduate from engineering school today and not have a working knowledge of computer programming. I graduated with just a 2 year degree in electronics technology almost 40 years ago and it is where I first learned to program. We learned about microcontrollers and learned to program them long before the general public knew what they were. My friend graduated with a Chem E 40 years ago and even he had programming in college.

If it were me I would go to that school and demand they return my tuition. A working knowledge of programming is vital in almost any current engineering discipline .
 

Brian Griffin

Joined May 17, 2013
64
How is it possible to graduate from engineering school today and not have a working knowledge of computer programming. I graduated with just a 2 year degree in electronics technology almost 40 years ago and it is where I first learned to program. We learned about microcontrollers and learned to program them long before the general public knew what they were. My friend graduated with a Chem E 40 years ago and even he had programming in college.

If it were me I would go to that school and demand they return my tuition. A working knowledge of programming is vital in almost any current engineering discipline .
That is how it worked in the majority of the third-world countries, and I'm inside one of these places. Over there, the majority of the folks studied for the exams and not for the appreciation of the knowledge. These conditioning has been there in these nations (especially Eastern) for a thousand years and a lot of patience is needed to work around these attitudes. I believe these traits are *not* a negative one, but it is deemed essential for the survival of the people in these nations as they struggle from poverty and wars in the past.

I have worked with students and academic staff in my former campus as a lab technician, and believe me, most of the EEE students were trainwrecks, even with a high GPA ones. The study materials were not updated since 10 years ago, and many paperwork must be done just to change the format which discourages academic staff to perform the modifications. Therefore, these students struggled with many basic concepts and they have a weak attitude of learning. However, all is not lost as I tried to teach them (not do their homework!) and carefully point out the basics that needed learning, and leave some small related topics for them to ponder about when they are at their dorm rooms. The results were positive, some of the students were grateful of my guidances and they all went to have a comfortable life in the college after I left.

What is worse is the academic staff are having the same problem - most of them are not qualified to teach, but they are good in engaging in office politics. That is why I left my academic world and went straight to being an engineer - which is what I'm proud of now.

The problem is not just inherent in the college. It is ingrained in the education system. Let me explain this:

In Asian countries, people should deal with passing the exams. Due to what? Escaping poverty, as I mentioned earlier. The motivation is this: just lock up in room, hit the books, do not question anything else, must match the answer scripts, rinse and repeat. Extra curricular activities are mostly prohibited, and even if not prohibited, it's just the badminton or some harmless non-contact sports. You know that in some Asian countries, they push their kids for badminton because it's the only sport in the universe. And yes, I'm that victim! Every inch of the education is just about securing and scoring marks, marks and more god damned marks. There is no room for understanding and appreciation of knowledge.

One example: I grew up in a tiger parent environment - I was pushed to score exams for scholarship, but I wasn't academically inclined. Half of the time I was bullied at school because I was an average kid. At non-schooling hours, I spent a lot of time reading about electronics and messing around with them. When I was 14, being that computer-game junkie, I started learning C++ from the book I got from pestering my dad, and he reluctantly gave in afterwards. My dad kept hammering that I shouldn't learn programming because it wasn't important and it would affect my studies. Worse still, he advised me to join the medical line because there are endless supply of people getting into health troubles.

I didn't listened: I just secretly practised the programming at my free time. As that "disobedient" kid, I sat for hours thinking how to write programs. One of the things I attempted was a music notation software, but couldn't get past that stage. However, I learned it from "hits and misses" and not through exams.

The strangest part is, I graduated as a Medical Technology engineering cert, and I learned all the programming and the electronics outside the campus rather than inside the campus. I have been working as an engineer for almost 3 years now after my postgraduate since then.

What I would summarize is: programming skills are sharpened by good learning attitude. It is blunt when it is used for exams.
 

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
1,616
Good for you for trying to overcome your situation. It's like eating an elephant, just start one bite at a time. There is a ton of free reading about android online, start with the overview and work your way down to the details. Do the exercises and write your own code. Make up an idea then implement it, that's how you learn. Good luck!
 

absf

Joined Dec 29, 2010
1,942
That is how it worked in the majority of the third-world countries, and I'm inside one of these places. Over there, the majority of the folks studied for the exams and not for the appreciation of the knowledge. These conditioning has been there in these nations (especially Eastern) for a thousand years and a lot of patience is needed to work around these attitudes. I believe these traits are *not* a negative one, but it is deemed essential for the survival of the people in these nations as they struggle from poverty and wars in the past.

I have worked with students and academic staff in my former campus as a lab technician, and believe me, most of the EEE students were trainwrecks, even with a high GPA ones. The study materials were not updated since 10 years ago, and many paperwork must be done just to change the format which discourages academic staff to perform the modifications. Therefore, these students struggled with many basic concepts and they have a weak attitude of learning. However, all is not lost as I tried to teach them (not do their homework!) and carefully point out the basics that needed learning, and leave some small related topics for them to ponder about when they are at their dorm rooms. The results were positive, some of the students were grateful of my guidances and they all went to have a comfortable life in the college after I left.

What is worse is the academic staff are having the same problem - most of them are not qualified to teach, but they are good in engaging in office politics. That is why I left my academic world and went straight to being an engineer - which is what I'm proud of now.

The problem is not just inherent in the college. It is ingrained in the education system. Let me explain this:

In Asian countries, people should deal with passing the exams. Due to what? Escaping poverty, as I mentioned earlier. The motivation is this: just lock up in room, hit the books, do not question anything else, must match the answer scripts, rinse and repeat. Extra curricular activities are mostly prohibited, and even if not prohibited, it's just the badminton or some harmless non-contact sports. You know that in some Asian countries, they push their kids for badminton because it's the only sport in the universe. And yes, I'm that victim! Every inch of the education is just about securing and scoring marks, marks and more god damned marks. There is no room for understanding and appreciation of knowledge.

One example: I grew up in a tiger parent environment - I was pushed to score exams for scholarship, but I wasn't academically inclined. Half of the time I was bullied at school because I was an average kid. At non-schooling hours, I spent a lot of time reading about electronics and messing around with them. When I was 14, being that computer-game junkie, I started learning C++ from the book I got from pestering my dad, and he reluctantly gave in afterwards. My dad kept hammering that I shouldn't learn programming because it wasn't important and it would affect my studies. Worse still, he advised me to join the medical line because there are endless supply of people getting into health troubles.

I didn't listened: I just secretly practised the programming at my free time. As that "disobedient" kid, I sat for hours thinking how to write programs. One of the things I attempted was a music notation software, but couldn't get past that stage. However, I learned it from "hits and misses" and not through exams.

The strangest part is, I graduated as a Medical Technology engineering cert, and I learned all the programming and the electronics outside the campus rather than inside the campus. I have been working as an engineer for almost 3 years now after my postgraduate since then.

What I would summarize is: programming skills are sharpened by good learning attitude. It is blunt when it is used for exams.
Very well explained Brian. As a Malaysian too, I have the same experience like you but luckily my mom is illerarate and my father was too devoted in his business he didn't know what I was doing in my free times..

He only knew that I kept asking for money to buy books and have no ideas what I was reading.

Allen
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
24,979
That is how it worked in the majority of the third-world countries, and I'm inside one of these places. Over there, the majority of the folks studied for the exams and not for the appreciation of the knowledge.
...
What is worse is the academic staff are having the same problem - most of them are not qualified to teach, but they are good in engaging in office politics.
Oh, and here I thought you were going to say something about how it is different over there. ;)

Kidding aside, I agree with you, both from what I have seen in some of the folks on this forum and the foreign students on campus. Neither groups, certainly, is likely to be representative of most students in the countries they come from, but it is still telling.

Of course, it is not homogenous, either. Regardless of where they are from, there are going to be students that don't care about learning, but only the piece of paper, and others that don't care about the piece of paper, but only the learning, and others that care about the piece of paper only to the degree that it reflects the learning they've attained. Plus you've got plenty of folks that don't care about either. What really changes from culture to culture are the relative distributions of those groups.
 
Last edited:

spinnaker

Joined Oct 29, 2009
7,837
Kidding aside, I agree with you, both from what I have seen in some of the folks on this forum and the foreign students on campus. Neither groups, certainly, is likely to be representative of most students in the countries they come from, but it is still telling.

.

And American companies are hiring them in droves because the labor is cheap. Some cheap, we hired contractors to convert a bunch of small applications. I ended up having to rewrite 75% of what they wrote. We have them on a number of really large projects too. Projects out of my control. If I were a betting man, I would put money down on the fact that either there will be major issues in the next few years and there will be no one around to know how to fix them. Or at least an upgrade will be needed and there will be no one to figure out how to implement it.

We have hired some people from India that are brilliant. My guess is that they come from families that understand the importance of a good education and their kids are going to get one no matter the circumstances.


Adding not caring about education with a piss poor school and you have a pretty noxious combination.
 
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