First room temperature superconductor...

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cmartinez

Joined Jan 17, 2007
7,084
"2.6 million times that of Earth’s atmosphere"

It's been suspected that Metallic Hydrogen was a superconductor at room temperature since the 60's so I suspect the other elements act to reduce the pressure needed to form Metallic Hydrogen from 4 million to 2.6 million.

https://cen.acs.org/physical-chemistry/computational-chemistry/Metallic-hydrogen-simulations-reconcile-experimental/98/i35
Indeed, it's suspected by some that Jupiter's core is a superconductor. That would explain its intense magnetic field.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
7,591
Indeed, it's suspected by some that Jupiter's core is a superconductor. That would explain its intense magnetic field.
As usual we are using science to 'discover' what 'nature' is already doing in most cases, cool but not surprising. The real breakthrough would be a metastable Metallic Hydrogen compound that would remain in a superconduction state after the pressure is removed.
 

Wendy

Joined Mar 24, 2008
22,164
I remember reading about this several years ago. Another researcher thought he had Metallic hydrogen hydrogen for a while but it was such a small quantity trying to clean the sample the sample blew away. We will probably never know if he had metallic hydrogen or not, many people remain skeptical. Technically metallic hydrogen is a form of degenerate matter. NASA thinks it would make an exquisite rocket fuel. He used a diamond anvil to make the metallic hydrogen sample. I'm still trying to stay current on this type of research.
 
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ZCochran98

Joined Jul 24, 2018
92
It's fascinating stuff, that's for sure (and, indeed, metallic hydrogen or materials with hydrogen in them that undergo a similar phase change tend to be superconductive). My research is actually largely in the area of superconductors, but more of applications of Josephson junctions (I'm doing my thesis on them), so I'm looking forward to seeing if they can now do "room-pressure" superconduction....

I must say: I was initially concerned, before reading the actual post, that this was going to be about the since-discredited (for Bell-Labs-Schon-scandal-like issues) claim to room-temperature superconductivity in a gold-silver nanoparticle array (the authors have plots with identical noise characteristics, like what Schon had, and refuse to allow anyone to see their setup). It's been known for a very long time that good conductors make the worst superconductors.
 
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