Finding Arduino Programmer

Thread Starter

james211

Joined May 29, 2012
250
I'm looking for some advice on where I can go to hire an Arduino programmer for a project. I've tried a few of the freelancer.com and similar options but I haven't been happy with the overall results.

Hoping someone on here can guide me in the right directions.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
10,975
It would be helpful if you described the scope of the project and your budget.

That being said, programming Arduino is pretty simple. There are packages to do just about everything. I prefer to do things on my own; I learn more that way.
 

Thread Starter

james211

Joined May 29, 2012
250
Sorry, I just didn't want to put too much out there as I wasn't sure if I was posting in the correct place.

The run-down

Hardware:
-Arduino Uno 3
-12v Proportion valve & Driver-007
-Digital Pressure gauge that outputs 4-20mA signal
-LCD Display
-Power Supply Meanwell RS-25-12 (I will need to up this as I need 14v for the valve to completely open).

Here's what I'm trying to achieve. Currently I am controlling the proportion valve with a potentiometer, while it works, I'm not enjoying it, there's no tactile feel to it, considering moving to a rotary encoder. Additionally I'd like to consider the idea of PID control so I can set the valve to a specific percentage or kPa and let the Arduino maintain that (within reason of course) - better ideas are welcome.

The display currently reads the digital gas gauge and displays the output in both a percentage as well as kPa. The 4-20mA output goes through a current to voltage converter - I'm not sure this is the best option, and I'm open to other ideas.
 

Irving

Joined Jan 30, 2016
797
That'll work, though you probably don't need the converter, depending on how the output of the gauge works. Do you have a link to the gauge?

PID control is straight forward, there's various ways to do it. Tuning a PID is a bit of an art, but there are ways to automate that.

Your Driver-007 link isn't working.
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
13,926
It probably works both ways. People who hire somebody to do piece work programming lack a precise understanding of what is involved especially when they are not experts at defining requirements up front. People want to be paid for their time and effort, and you get what you pay for. I've been on the site for over a decade and a half, and there have been very few if any match ups where both sides got what they wanted. I know this is anecdotal but the usual problem is an unwillingness or inability to pay somebody what a quality job is worth. You will be farther along if you just put in the effort, learn the material, and do it yourself. Trust me on this.
 
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Thread Starter

james211

Joined May 29, 2012
250
It probably works both ways. People who hire somebody to do piece work programming lack a precise understanding of what is involved especially when they are not experts a defining requirements up front. People want to be paid for their time and effort, and you get what you pay for. I've been on the site for over a decade and a half, and there have been very few if any match ups where both sides got what they wanted. I know this is anecdotal but the usual problems is an unwillingness or inability to pay somebody what a quality job is worth. You will be farther along if you just put in the effort, learn the material, and do it yourself. Trust me on this.
I have to be honest, I'd love to know how to do everything I want to do with Arduino's but its just too difficult to do while maintaining a job, a side business and two young kids. Had I started learning this 15yrs ago I'd probably stand a chance.
I appreciate your insight and honesty regarding freelancer/fiverr websites as well.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
10,975
Had I started learning this 15yrs ago I'd probably stand a chance.
There's not much to Arduino. Most of the heavy lifting has already been done. I've only been using it for a year. But I approached it with decades of programming and circuit design experience.

I don't do piece work; it's just not worth the bother. As @Papabravo mentioned, people get sticker shock when they get a bid from a qualified individual. You're not going to get any work from a professional for minimum wage.

But all of us give free advice.
 

bwilliams60

Joined Nov 18, 2012
1,325
I have six decades in on this planet and never say never. I picked up an Arduino this year and found a guy on Youtube by the name of Paul Mcwhorter and he put together a brilliantly laid out tutorial that walks you through Arduino step by step and they are done in short half hour or so segments. You will learn a ton and the Arduino forums are chock full of knowledgeable people as well as the people on AAC. You can't go wrong. @Papabravo has the best advice. Do it yourself. You will enjoy it more in the end.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
21,334
Hope I can provide some insight to your quandary.

Off the top of my head what you are asking a professional would charge $10k-$20k easily if you want the job done properly.

On the other hand, Arduino is designed exactly to help DIY and hobbyists to jump-start into the embedded microcontroller world quickly and painlessly. If you want to go Arduino the best advice would be to take the time and learn how to navigate around the platform yourself.

The other path will cost $$$.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
9,725
That doesn't solve the basic problem of doing work for hire for individuals. Are you able to gauge the satisfaction level of the folks who have engaged contractors via that forum?
And the TS has already gone that route:
I've tried a few of the freelancer.com and similar options but I haven't been happy with the overall results.
What were the results? Why weren't you happy? Did you pay up front and get nothing? And so forth. Your problem as described could be solved with a simple 8-bit processor using Assembly. Everyone who has responded to this thread so far could do that. Why do you want an Arduino? Most important, what are your specific criteria for success?
 
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