Electrostatic's role in planet formation

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cmartinez

Joined Jan 17, 2007
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ci139

Joined Jul 11, 2016
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might be but the moons and planets usually form when there is enough material orbitting around the host body . . . the Jupiter has interesting moons , all different build up . . .
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
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I thought NASA did an experiment on the ISS (or maybe a shuttle experiment) a while ago. Dust is attracted by static electricity until the blob gets large enough for it to have sufficient gravity to attract more objects.
 

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cmartinez

Joined Jan 17, 2007
7,372
might be but the moons and planets usually form when there is enough material orbitting around the host body . . . the Jupiter has interesting moons , all different build up . . .
That's the article's point, I think. Celestial bodies are created by gravitational unbalances, but electrostatic forces play a fundamental role before even that becomes important.
 

ci139

Joined Jul 11, 2016
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Glenn Holland

Joined Dec 26, 2014
705
On the subject of the formation of planets and the solar system, Hans Alfven proposed the "hydromagnetic" theory of the formation of galaxies and stellar systems. The theory proposed that magnetic fields are "frozen in" to a huge cloud of plasma which is then compressed to a high density by the angular momentum of the cloud.

The magnetic fields and the plasma supposedly came from the various charged particles (electrons, protons, and ionized atoms) ejected during the Big Bang

Frozen in magnetic fields are still quite common and the most common examples are sunspots and solar flares. The mathematical model of a frozen in fields is a bit complicated, but it can be reduced to some simple rules.

More on this later.
 

ci139

Joined Jul 11, 2016
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i'm not quite sure whether the following applies (not read about stellar formation) . . . but it's interesting that lighter elements are more near to the center H than the heavier Fe Cr . . .

/// the Sun supposedly started to generate Fe about 240 Ma and radiate microwaves . . . ! not so long ago

about solar mag.fld (is not what i searched , what it was was confirmation to 240Ma versus 2.4Ga ??? -- i tend to mess up with the Zeros . . .)
(also spotted) https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/4/100414-moon-magnetosphere-solar-wind/
 
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Glenn Holland

Joined Dec 26, 2014
705
i'm not quite sure whether the following applies (not read about stellar formation) . . . but it's interesting that lighter elements are more near to the center H than the heavier Fe Cr . . .

/// the Sun supposedly started to generate Fe about 240 Ma and radiate microwaves . . . ! not so long ago

about solar mag.fld (is not what i searched , what it was was confirmation to 240Ma versus 2.4Ga ??? -- i tend to mess up with the Zeros . . .)
(also spotted) https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/4/100414-moon-magnetosphere-solar-wind/
The Sun does not have sufficient mass to fuse lighter nuclei to form iron. The formation of iron is an "endoenergetic" (energy absorbing) process which would consume the thermal and potential energy leading to the collapse of the Sun. The Sun does not have enough mass to form a neutron star or a black hole and the result would be a white dwarf.
 

ci139

Joined Jul 11, 2016
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??? . . . "Figure 6.14 The Visible Spectrum of Sunlight"

/// . . . i might have miss interpreted the article -- it was related to when the Earth formed it's ozone layer and when the Sun started to emit in microwave range ← the least had to do with the Fe in the core of the Sun . . . -- it is possible the Fe been present and collected from meteorites
 
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Glenn Holland

Joined Dec 26, 2014
705
Yes, the Sun consists of some amount of iron that already existed when it was formed. However, the Sun is not creating iron from lighter elements.
 

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cmartinez

Joined Jan 17, 2007
7,372
Yes, the Sun consists of some amount of iron that already existed when it was formed. However, the Sun is not creating iron from lighter elements.
Not yet at least. But it inevitably will, if I understand stellar evolution correctly. And then the heavier elements will be formed when it goes nova.
 

Glenn Holland

Joined Dec 26, 2014
705
Not yet at least. But it inevitably will, if I understand stellar evolution correctly. And then the heavier elements will be formed when it goes nova.
The Sun does not have enough mass to create a supernova blast that releases iron into space and I believe carbon is the heaviest element that the Sun can create through fusion.

However, during the carbon forming sequence, the Sun will expand as a "red giant" and eventually eject most of its mass into the remains of the solar system. The remains will be a white dwarf that will eventually cool into something resembling a planet.
 

ci139

Joined Jul 11, 2016
1,696
the event - i inquired info about was likely - https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/paleoclimate-timeline/ - the sudden cooling at 225-215 Mya . . . if i remember right (a multi-diciplinar parallel study - i just needed some numbers and dates to match . . . so i fully didn't dug into this) . . . an attempt to fast restore what was being studied XT /// randomz : http://ossfoundation.us/projects/environment/global-warming/natural-cycle#section-10 . . . and below . . .
, https://www.jstor.org/stable/55231?seq=1
1576400919118.gif
 
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Thread Starter

cmartinez

Joined Jan 17, 2007
7,372
The Sun does not have enough mass to create a supernova blast that releases iron into space and I believe carbon is the heaviest element that the Sun can create through fusion.

However, during the carbon forming sequence, the Sun will expand as a "red giant" and eventually eject most of its mass into the remains of the solar system. The remains will be a white dwarf that will eventually cool into something resembling a planet.
I used the word "nova", not "supernova". I'm well aware of the need of far more mass for the sun to explode in such a way. I have to admit though, that it's been a while since read about this subject. I recall that novas shine brightly for a brief period of time, and then they become white dwarfs. No explosion need be involved. But I might be wrong, of course.

Truth being told, I haven't taken the time to google this subject thoroughly... it's more fun for me to discuss and learn about it here... ;)
 
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