Electronics Engineering

Thread Starter

frenkie1on1kaizomuninaru

Joined Nov 12, 2023
3
Good day , I hope this message finds you well , I am a first year student in electronics engineering , and wanted to ask some question about my project

1.What are some of the reason you choose to pursue this career ?

2.What struggles have you encountered at work and how did your math and physics understanding in your project helped you out (can you help with concrete example

3.Do you find team work to be better for finding solutions or does working alone makes the best progress

4.What advice would you give to a new electronics engineer on the field

I would really appreciate if you guys helped me out with this project thank you.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
28,698
Good day , I hope this message finds you well , I am a first year student in electronics engineering , and wanted to ask some question about my project
"1.What are some of the reason you choose to pursue this career ?"
I guess unconsciously I had a yen for from an early age.

"4.What advice would you give to a new electronics engineer on the field?"
Study, carry out experiments, build circuits in practice etc.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
16,937
1.What are some of the reason you choose to pursue this career ?
I chose electrical engineering because it was something I was interested in as a child.
2.What struggles have you encountered at work and how did your math and physics understanding in your project helped you out (can you help with concrete example
Rarely had to use any physics or advanced math on the job.
3.Do you find team work to be better for finding solutions or does working alone makes the best progress
The days of some antisocial technical hotshot getting anywhere are long gone. If you can't work in a team, companies won't want you even if you're some know-it-all.
4.What advice would you give to a new electronics engineer on the field
Be flexible. Early in my career I found that I was interested in more than designing circuits and found my niche working on leading edge process technology for a large semiconductor company.

I spent 18 months working at a semiconductor startup. It was a lot of work with few rewards. They went out of business due to poor management decisions (CEO knew nothing about the business and only got the job because his father was chairman of the conglomerate that owned the company). I went back to the large semiconductor company before the startup went under.
 
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WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
30,072
1.What are some of the reason you choose to pursue this career ?
Have always had a love of understanding how things work. Designing things that do what I want them to is a natural extension of that.

2.What struggles have you encountered at work and how did your math and physics understanding in your project helped you out (can you help with concrete example
Virtually everything I do sits on a foundation of math and physics that forms how I think about problems and how I go about solving them.

3.Do you find team work to be better for finding solutions or does working alone makes the best progress
Depends entirely on both the problem and the team. In many instances a good mixture of the two works best.

4.What advice would you give to a new electronics engineer on the field
If you don't love problem solving, then find a different field -- engineers are problem solvers. That's what we bring to the table and why people are willing to pay us.

Also, while there is nothing that says that you must love what you do, never forget that you will always be competing against people that do.
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
9,839
Whichever moderator closed the TS's other identical post, could he please link the to two together, so that all the participants' answers are visible in the same place.
 

Thread Starter

frenkie1on1kaizomuninaru

Joined Nov 12, 2023
3
Have always had a love of understanding how things work. Designing things that do what I want them to is a natural extension of that.



Virtually everything I do sits on a foundation of math and physics that forms how I think about problems and how I go about solving them.



Depends entirely on both the problem and the team. In many instances a good mixture of the two works best.



If you don't love problem solving, then find a different field -- engineers are problem solvers. That's what we bring to the table and why people are willing to pay us.

Also, while there is nothing that says that you must love what you do, never forget that you will always be competing against people that do.
I want to thank you so much for helping me with the answears that you provided, your prespective was indeed of value in my project.

All the best,
 

Lundwall_Paul

Joined Oct 18, 2011
236
Good day , I hope this message finds you well , I am a first year student in electronics engineering , and wanted to ask some question about my project

1.What are some of the reason you choose to pursue this career ?

2.What struggles have you encountered at work and how did your math and physics understanding in your project helped you out (can you help with concrete example

3.Do you find team work to be better for finding solutions or does working alone makes the best progress

4.What advice would you give to a new electronics engineer on the field

I would really appreciate if you guys helped me out with this project thank you.
#1 Started with TV repair in the 60's and making Heathkits. I just took to it at a young age and went on to the Air Force in electronics. Mainly old WWII radars. New systems followed later in my career. Completed school during my service time. I then took a job at Lockheed working on designs for multiple platforms.

#2 Math skills age 19, when I started off as a radar technician I would dig into circuits to see how they worded, I used formulas and did the math behind them and compared them to the actual circuit. This reinforced my understanding of the math that was used to design circuits.

#3 For most of my electronics career I worked alone. I never ignored the team, I learned a ton for my mentors and coworkers. It was just the nature of the job to work alone.
Working alone was good it often led to more lab experiments.

#4 The biggest problem with some folks that I ran across in my 45 years of electronics was fear. The fear seemed to be centered around making mistakes and fear of getting in trouble for those mistakes. This in my opinion that fear became an obstacle and slowed down a lot of good folks. I really enjoyed a challenge and didn't hesitate to dig into a project. I learned a lot from my many mistakes. With all that you must understand the hazards of the job. Like high voltage, radiation, chemicals, your surroundings..... fear it but greatly respect and follow safety guidelines.
 
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