ELECTROMAGNETISM

Thread Starter

Keiomas

Joined Mar 16, 2022
2
I understand that a shell of soft core iron electromagnets when battery powered will produce fields of magnetism
that can drive a shaft of properly oriented opposing poles of strong magnets attached to a central spinning shaft, of
course, if oriented properly, etc. I also know that magnets in motion will produce an electric current field or fields.
My question: If I construct a central spinning shaft, driven by a motor, with strong magnets attached surrounding the outside
of the shaft, will I be able to induce strong electric currents in multiple coils in a housing surrounding the central spinning shaft
and if the coils in the surrounding housing contain soft iron cores what would the magnetic pole orientation of the coils be or
would magnets need to be included at the tip of each soft iron core coil in the surrounding housing to produce the electrical
current field in each coil?
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
9,993
Adding extra coils won't generate more power. It's likely to reduce the efficiency of the system when compared to optimized (highest rate of change of the magnetic flux and largest area) rotor coils and magnets.
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
6,046
Welcome to AAC.

You've invented the dynamo! But you left out the commutator, you need one of those. Unfortunately, old Hippolyte Pixii beat you to it. I would suggest, if you really want to understand this stuff, you start out right and learn the foundation.

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The lectures of Walter Lewin at MIT are a fantastic resource and you can watch them on YouTube. There is some heavy math but if you are up for it, don't worry, you can let it go by and just listen to the things you can understand. The course is Electricity and Magnetism and it will blow your mind.

I hope you find it fascinating.
 

DickCappels

Joined Aug 21, 2008
8,842
When I was 11 years old I was running a small permanent magnet motor from one of those really big dry cells. While the motor was running I connected a 1.5V light bulb in parallel with the motor and noted that the motor must be making voltage equal to that voltage driving it, and thus the light bulb was being lit for "free". I was not yet aware of the U.S. patent system, and missed an outstanding opportunity.
 

MrSalts

Joined Apr 2, 2020
1,845
When I was in elementary school, I designed a system using a magnet in a wheel and one on the fender. As the magnet on the wheel passed the fender magnet, a small stick flipped the fender magnet to propel the wheel in a complete revolution. I figured this was done all,the time by smart engineers so i never bothered to figure out out to flip the fender magnet back and complete a second revolution (and then, continue on forever). One day I'll have time to look into it and finish my project.
 

Thread Starter

Keiomas

Joined Mar 16, 2022
2
Welcome to AAC.

You've invented the dynamo! But you left out the commutator, you need one of those. Unfortunately, old Hippolyte Pixii beat you to it. I would suggest, if you really want to understand this stuff, you start out right and learn the foundation.

The lectures of Walter Lewin at MIT are a fantastic resource and you can watch them on YouTube. There is some heavy math but if you are up for it, don't worry, you can let it go by and just listen to the things you can understand. The course is Electricity and Magnetism and it will blow your mind.

I hope you find it fascinating.
I very much appreciate your response to my poorly explained question. My attempt to extract more information without showing the actual geometry of my design is a foolish pursuit. The portion of my design I have asked the question about
will not require a commutator, like in the case of the Faraday Disk because the Magnets will already be rotating at high RPMs on a central shaft. I am trying to understand how best to arrange the coils in a stationary housing around the central shaft of magnets rotating at high speed in order to produce the most current in the arrangement of coils which are in extremely close proximity to the arrangement of rotating magnets. In other words, an electromagnet will repel the like pole of a permanent magnet when energized with an electrical source. Can rotating strong magnets in close proximity to copper coils produce an electric field in those coils? I will watch Walter Lewin's Lectures but there is no substitute for building and testing my concept.

Thanks again!
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
6,046
I very much appreciate your response to my poorly explained question. My attempt to extract more information without showing the actual geometry of my design is a foolish pursuit. The portion of my design I have asked the question about
will not require a commutator, like in the case of the Faraday Disk because the Magnets will already be rotating at high RPMs on a central shaft. I am trying to understand how best to arrange the coils in a stationary housing around the central shaft of magnets rotating at high speed in order to produce the most current in the arrangement of coils which are in extremely close proximity to the arrangement of rotating magnets. In other words, an electromagnet will repel the like pole of a permanent magnet when energized with an electrical source. Can rotating strong magnets in close proximity to copper coils produce an electric field in those coils? I will watch Walter Lewin's Lectures but there is no substitute for building and testing my concept.

Thanks again!
The problem is "rotating" is completely ambiguous but the Fleming Left Hand Rule will tell you right away is the motion of the magnets with induce current based on the relationship to the coils.

Do watch those lectures.
 
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