Dehumidifier Problems - any dehumidifier experts here?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Lumenosity, Jan 13, 2018.

  1. Lumenosity

    Thread Starter Member

    Mar 1, 2017
    282
    34
    I have an LG LD651EBL 65 pint De-humidifier.

    When it's running it really does a great job of removing moisture from the air so I'm thinking the compressor and refrigerant are both fine.
    Let me first clarify that the air filter is spotlessly clean. Looking inside the unit, I see no build up of any kind. It looks clean front, back inside and out so I can rule out filter obstruction etc..

    Where the problem comes in are in two areas.....

    1).
    The humidistat doesn't seem to be working properly. I have to set the humidity to 70% to get it to maintain 45% humidity in the room.
    If I set it below that, it pretty much runs non stop. I could be wrong and it could be something else, so if you're knowledgeable with dehumidifiers can you suggest what else it might be? Is it possible the humidistat could need cleaning? I read somewhere that cleaning it with alcohol helps?

    2).
    Even with the humidistat set to 70%, the unit seems to cycle on and off too frequently.

    I timed the intervals and it is 8 minutes ON, followed by 2 minutes 50 seconds OFF.....with a 15% fluctuation so it is not precisely times, but close.
    Based on that, I would think it is a sensor based issue and not timer based?

    Do you think cleaning the humidistat would help?
    Do you think I need to replace the humidistat?
    Any other suggestions?

    Thanks
     
  2. BobaMosfet

    Senior Member

    Jul 1, 2009
    321
    68
    If there is nothing wrong with the transducer that senses humidity (no hysterisis issues, etc), it's likely a component failure related to it that is throwing off it's calibration. I'm not an expert, but dehumidifiers (and I have one) are relatively simple. Strip moisture out of the air by condensation on coils, the same way an air-conditioner strips moisture out of air to take heat out of it.

    You stated the other aspects seem to be fine, and it's clean. As long as it has not lost any refrigerant (see a service professional or vendor) then the only thing left is the humidity transducer and related circuit components.
     
  3. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
    8,029
    6,780

    First, make sure the room is closed. You cannot have open windows and doors or you will be trying to dehumidify the world.

    Next, concrete floors should be sealed to make sure humidity is not wicking up through the pores, you will never get all of the humidity out. Same with the walls (drylok is a good brand - but this is not intended for floors).

    Next, add a fan to the room to circulate the air or the dehumidifier will dehumidify the local area and shut off, then, diffusion will bring humid air back into the zone and start the humidifier again.

    Then get back with your issues

    http://www.drylok.com/
     
    MrSoftware and cmartinez like this.
  4. Lumenosity

    Thread Starter Member

    Mar 1, 2017
    282
    34
    Wait...please tell me noone would actually do that?
    Maybe I should have mentioned I have another dehumidifier that works perfectly in the same space?

    Maybe I should have mentioned I have another dehumidifier that works perfectly in the same space?

    [/QUOTE]

    I didn't mention it, but there is a large ceiling fan in the room and it is usually on when the dehumidifier is running for just that reason.
     
  5. Lumenosity

    Thread Starter Member

    Mar 1, 2017
    282
    34
    That gives me an idea....maybe I'll look into testing the transducer.
    I do have equipment for detecting leaking CFC's and most refrigerants. When I take it apart I'll use it to "sniff" for any leaks.
     
  6. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
    8,029
    6,780
    I didn't mention it, but there is a large ceiling fan in the room and it is usually on when the dehumidifier is running for just that reason.[/QUOTE]

    Disconnect your "bad" dehumidifier and check how well it runs. If the "bad" one is taking most of the load and trying to achieve a lower humidity than the "good one", of course it will appear to be working long. Also, even setting both to 45%, each will have its own interpretati9n of 45% unless they are carefully calibrated.
     
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