Connecting multiple wires

Thread Starter

DQQpy

Joined Aug 31, 2017
17
Hi,

so I want to connect 3 jumper wires (the small ones for breadboards) together, preferably in a way that I can easily remove them later, but without using a huge breadboard. I thought of something like a jumper bridge with 3 slots, so I can just plug them in, but I couldn't find anything small and suitable yet. What's the general approach for such problems? Am I just missing some stupid simple solution?
The reason why I want to do this is, that apparently I have to connect the grounds of power source, Arduino, and motor driver board, if that helps.
 

dendad

Joined Feb 20, 2016
3,176

philba

Joined Aug 17, 2017
960
Depending on the arduino, you have either 2 or 3 gnd "sockets". Since they are connected on the arduino pcb, you can just use each for one of the gnd jumpers.

This is one of the reasons I prefer Nanos and Teensys to Unos and Megas. Much more breadboard friendly - then you don't have the how do I connect 2 or 3 jumpers to the same pin problem.

And FWIW, it's generally better to use a "star" ground configuration (all subcircuit gnds connect at a single point) but I doubt this a case where it will matter. Places where it matters are in things like low side current sensing.
 

Thread Starter

DQQpy

Joined Aug 31, 2017
17
Edit: Thanks, I forgot about the multiple GND sockets.
But how would you do this without multiple connector pins?
I noticed that I need such a connector somewhere else too, with a 3 pin power switch, here's a sketch: https://pasteboard.co/GIFGDjL.png

eb6f936f-0ca2-47db-aa26-90b476339bcc.png
Mods Note:
Please upload your circuit to the forum.
 
Last edited:

philba

Joined Aug 17, 2017
960
Not sure I understand your question. The 3 gnd connections go to separate circuits. You can always solder wires together to make what ever kind of jerry rigged harness you want. At some point, that solderless bread board will start looking a lot better.

And by the way, 18 Ga solid core wire fits really well in the arduino sockets. I've got a bunch of it I use to make jumpers for SBBs and Arduinos. 20 Ga will do but is a little loose in the arduinos (but better fit in the SBBs).
 

Thread Starter

DQQpy

Joined Aug 31, 2017
17
The 3 gnd connections go to separate circuits.
If youre talking about the rocker switch, afaik that's the basic way to wire it up.
You can always solder wires together to make what ever kind of jerry rigged harness you want. At some point, that solderless bread board will start looking a lot better.
Well I can solder them together, but as I said I wondered if there is a nice temporary solution without breadboards. Apparently there isn't.
Actually, for the future I might make my own 3 pin jumper bridges by soldering the male ends of a male-female pin header together.
 

tranzz4md

Joined Apr 10, 2015
310
How do you connect 3 wires?
-wirenut
-Simple twist
- crimp connectors
-Twist and solder
- nut, bolt, and washers,
-exothermic weld
- proprietary spring type connector
- U-bolt

I'd say you're "just missing" something.
 

Thread Starter

DQQpy

Joined Aug 31, 2017
17
Terminal blocks. They come in different sizes. You cut the strip to fit your needs. You will be able to fit a number of 22AWG wires into one side of the connector.
Thanks, some of them actually do what I want, but e.g. the one on your picture connects only 2 wires, and there seems to be no clear distinct name giving. Also, my pin headers are a lot cheaper, so I'll probably stick to that.
 

shteii01

Joined Feb 19, 2010
4,647
Thanks, some of them actually do what I want, but e.g. the one on your picture connects only 2 wires, and there seems to be no clear distinct name giving. Also, my pin headers are a lot cheaper, so I'll probably stick to that.
Here is what you do.
Run all your device wires (Power ground, Uno ground, Motor ground) on one side of the terminal block.
Jumper them together with short wires (or even broken paper clips) on the other side.
 

Thread Starter

DQQpy

Joined Aug 31, 2017
17
I think he was saying to put multiple wires into one side. I looks like there is a lot of room there.
Oh, if that's the case that would make perfect sense.
Here is what you do.
Run all your device wires (Power ground, Uno ground, Motor ground) on one side of the terminal block.
Jumper them together with short wires (or even broken paper clips) on the other side.
Yeah, that seems like a proper solution, thanks!
 

cmartinez

Joined Jan 17, 2007
6,646
Here is what you do.
Run all your device wires (Power ground, Uno ground, Motor ground) on one side of the terminal block.
Jumper them together with short wires (or even broken paper clips) on the other side.
That's exactly how it's done in the industry. On the other hand, there's a whole universe of terminal blocks out there to choose from. The ones shown by MrChips are quite popular, but are a bit bulky for low current electronics applications. My personal favorites are from the Wago line of products.

Peronally, I try to avoid the screw-type of terminal blocks, and prefer the spring-type instead. Unlike the former, the latter can be connected and disconnected many times over without fear of damage or fatigue.

See the yellow bars in the second picture, attached to the last two groups of 5 blocks? Those are interconnects, only one wire (on top) is feeding a one group, and then its distributed to 5 pairs of wires (bottom). That is not a very good practice, btw, since each wire should have its own block. But there wasn't enough space in the enclosure for two groups of 10 blocks.

Capture.PNG

Capture 00.PNG

Capture 01.PNG
 

strantor

Joined Oct 3, 2010
5,178
I find these Wago Levernuts very handy.
I prefer them because I am religious in the use of wire ferrules. I don't like to use wirenuts because I find them tacky. These allow me to use ferrules and look better (but still a little tacky IMO)
 

cmartinez

Joined Jan 17, 2007
6,646
I find these Wago Levernuts very handy.
I prefer them because I am religious in the use of wire ferrules. I don't like to use wirenuts because I find them tacky. These allow me to use ferrules and look better (but still a little tacky IMO)
I like Wago, they're probably the best industrial connector block supplier available... but their prices are just insane!

That's why I also recommended dinkle
 
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