Can't figure markings on datasheet

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
8,662
This is a switch (momentary DPDT). The blackened dots are the common terminals of the two poles. There is no Vcc or ground, what each terminal connects to is up to you.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
30,473
Switches are passive mechanical devices. There is no Vcc or GND connection required unless the circuit application calls for connections to Vcc and GND.

Simple toggle switches and push buttons come in different arrangements of POLEs and THROWs.

They are classified as follows
SPST = Single Pole - Single Throw = This is single switch with two terminals, either NO or NC
SPDT = Single Pole - Double Throw = This is a single switch with three terminals 1-2-3. The switch can close 1-2 or 2-3
DPST = Double Pole - Single Throw = This is a two circuit switch with four out of six terminals, see DPDT
DPDT = Double Pole - Double Throw = This is a two circuit switch with six terminals, The switch will close 1-2 and 4-5 or 2-3 and 5-6.

Also
NO = Normally Open
NC = Normally Close

Your switch shown is a DPDT switch.
When the switch is not pressed, the circuit closed is 1-2 and 4-5.
When the switch is pressed, the circuit closed is 2-3 and 5-6.
 

Thread Starter

KEIKAS

Joined Oct 25, 2023
5
So for example if I connect GND and VCC to the middle terminals and the switches are open the current will pass to the 5-6 terminals?

And so would this schematic be correct?
1698248440715.png
 

Thread Starter

KEIKAS

Joined Oct 25, 2023
5
Well I'd like to use that specific push switch because it works the best in my case... Unless this counts as an "SPST" switch
1698260476112.png

Sorry, for not knowing everuthing... Just getting started
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
30,473
With three pins, it is likely to be a SPDT switch. Check the datasheet to identify the pins.

For simple 0/1 logic signal you can use all three pins with connections to Vcc and GND or you can use just two pins with pullup or pulldown resistor.
 

Thread Starter

KEIKAS

Joined Oct 25, 2023
5
The reason I chose the 6 pin version is because the seller doesn't state the datasheet I messaged him, but he said "I don't have it"

Also I'm ordering from a Chinese website so I have to use Translate to communicate with him...

Right now my plan is to order both type of switches and test them out because they're dirt cheap
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
8,662
An SPDT momentary switch can replace either a normally open or a normally closed SPST one. Which is likely why they offer that one and no SPST.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
30,473
Before going any further, show us, in the form of a circuit diagram, your application for a switch. What is the function or purpose of the switch?
 
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