books and ways recommendation on gaining electronic understanding

Thread Starter

abdulbadii

Joined Aug 30, 2017
48
What'd be some of the best books and methods or ways to go on acquiring better/deeper understanding in electronic for mediocre
Honestly I'm distressed as I really need the knowledge but indeed need it being very quicker (relative to common way of one takes)

Put it simply, I think of the knowledge gaining is: the electronic circuits entirely (by someone, somehow) have been classified, categorized, and mapped by the functions they're made use of and all that's so clearly mapped in such that one just like one lookup a people data table of its name address, or telephone for his purpose of creating a function/device or its opposite, reversing engineer the already existing function/device

Any bright discerning share is always invaluable and may God reward soon and later
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
30,122
First, it would help if you would learn how to write and properly punctuate English sentences (for example all sentences need a period at their end).

Your third sentence is so long and jumbled with little punctuation, that I can't really understand what you are saying.
You said "Put it simply" but what follows is anything but.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
12,431
To understand electronics first you must understand the basic fundamentals, then circuits, and then the more complex electronics. Jumpin in without the basic understanding will lead to confusion and incorrect decisions. Sort of like starting to build a house at the second level. Nothing to stand on. The book in post #4 would be good, but there are also other choices. An understanding of voltage, current, resistance, and power, will not take long to gain, and the math is simple.
 

MrAl

Joined Jun 17, 2014
9,179
What'd be some of the best books and methods or ways to go on acquiring better/deeper understanding in electronic for mediocre
Honestly I'm distressed as I really need the knowledge but indeed need it being very quicker (relative to common way of one takes)

Put it simply, I think of the knowledge gaining is: the electronic circuits entirely (by someone, somehow) have been classified, categorized, and mapped by the functions they're made use of and all that's so clearly mapped in such that one just like one lookup a people data table of its name address, or telephone for his purpose of creating a function/device or its opposite, reversing engineer the already existing function/device

Any bright discerning share is always invaluable and may God reward soon and later
Hi,

If you know algebra well you can get into this pretty quick. If you dont like algebra you are going to hate this.

Look for a book on Nodal Analysis, that's probably the simplest because it is very straightforward.
This will require knowing simultaneous algebraic equations which are not that hard to learn.
You can also use math software which makes calculations easier.

A course on this will usually require some lab work where you get hands on experience with the parts used in electronic circuits. Start with voltage sources and resistors. Learn that well before you move on.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
25,469

dcbingaman

Joined Jun 30, 2021
610
A couple of issues I had with that publication was the (Mis) - use of the Earth ground symbol throughout the book, instead of the circuit Common.
Also no chart of symbols included, at least not in my version.
True enough, though I personally think the book is still one of the better ones.
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
30,122
Look for a book on Nodal Analysis, that's probably the simplest because it is very straightforward.
I know a study of that is presented in typical college electronic courses, and doing nodal analysis by solving simultaneous equations may (possibly) be interesting mathematically, but I don't think it's particularly useful/helpful for beginning electronic understanding and/or design synthesis.
I used nodal analysis in college to solve problem circuit configurations unlikely to ever be seen in a real, useful circuit, but can't recall every using it in my plus 40 years of circuit design.
A full understanding of simple series/parallel circuits, and the proper application of Ohm's law is usually all you need.
Otherwise simulation or math software can generally solve problems if Ohm's law alone, can't.
 
Last edited:

dcbingaman

Joined Jun 30, 2021
610
I know a study of that is presented in typical college electronic courses, and doing nodal analysis by solving simultaneous equations may (possibly) be interesting mathematically, but I don't think it's particularly useful/helpful for beginning electronic understanding and/or design.
I used nodal analysis in college to solve problem circuit configurations unlikely to ever be seen in a real, useful circuit, but can't recall every using it in my plus 40 years of circuit design.
The proper application of Ohm's law is usually all you need.
Otherwise simulation or math software can usually solve problems if Ohm's law alone, can't.
I agree. I have been an EE for over 30 years and can't ever remember actually needing nodal analysis or mesh analysis for any problem during that time. The basic rules are the most important.
 

MrAl

Joined Jun 17, 2014
9,179
I know a study of that is presented in typical college electronic courses, and doing nodal analysis by solving simultaneous equations may (possibly) be interesting mathematically, but I don't think it's particularly useful/helpful for beginning electronic understanding and/or design synthesis.
I used nodal analysis in college to solve problem circuit configurations unlikely to ever be seen in a real, useful circuit, but can't recall every using it in my plus 40 years of circuit design.
A full understanding of simple series/parallel circuits, and the proper application of Ohm's law is usually all you need.
Otherwise simulation or math software can generally solve problems if Ohm's law alone, can't.
I agree that the basics should come first, but where you go from there depends on your long term goals.
Simulation will never reveal some of the amazing facts about circuits and math software is only as good as the user.
I believe a general analysis method is a good thing to learn because if you master it you will never have to ask another question about almost all circuits you find. It's also not a big deal to learn if you know how to do simultaneous equations.

People in the EE world will either find it interesting or not interesting depending on what kind of EE course it is and there are several types. So again it really depends on your long range goals and what you already know.
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
30,122
I believe a general analysis method is a good thing to learn because if you master it you will never have to ask another question about almost all circuits
Depends on what you mean by "general analysis method".
I don't think "Nodal Analysis" really falls into that category, as it seems rather specific to circuits with numerous nodes, which you don't need to solve for in typical electronic circuit design synthesis (not analysis).
It's also not a big deal to learn if you know how to do simultaneous equations.
After I learned how to solve simultaneous equations, I vowed to never do them again, if I didn't have to (and I haven't).
Some find that sort of math fun or interesting.
I don't.
It's the worst kind of grunt work to me.
(That's why I seldom respond to Homework questions that involve academic type math problems.)
 

Janis59

Joined Aug 21, 2017
1,407
I would say, the true Bibles in electronivcs are solely two: Titce&Schenk and Horowitz&Hill. Except the my childhood most belowed book for countryside boys: Borisov, Radio, that is very simple.... (however there everything was about vacuum tubes).
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
5,533
One book I have found lacking is a nice readable text on switched mode supplies and Magnetics in general. I didn’t find it adequately explained in my university course either.
Understanding V/L = dI/dt is the first stage.
Knowing which V, which I and which t and how to apply it is the key to understanding!
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
12,431
From some of the questions that I have seen at this site, the more basic beginning makes more sense. Starting with simple circuits and ohms law and basic power. Then on to the most basic circuit analysis.
An adequate foundation is important.
Consider the recent thread about not needing connections to light an LED.
 

MrAl

Joined Jun 17, 2014
9,179
Depends on what you mean by "general analysis method".
I don't think "Nodal Analysis" really falls into that category, as it seems rather specific to circuits with numerous nodes, which you don't need to solve for in typical electronic circuit design synthesis (not analysis).
After I learned how to solve simultaneous equations, I vowed to never do them again, if I didn't have to (and I haven't).
Some find that sort of math fun or interesting.
I don't.
It's the worst kind of grunt work to me.
(That's why I seldom respond to Homework questions that involve academic type math problems.)
Hi,

Oh yes i can see we approach things a bit differently.
What happens is a lot of theory depends on a full analysis of the topic at hand so i have used it so many times over the years i could never count the number. For example, when encountering a circuit i've never seen before. I've also been in the position where i had to prove a given new circuit idea would work, and that meant a really thorough analysis.

What happens if you dont have a good analysis method is you start to rely on formulas that other authors have developed, and i hate that because you cant see the underlying concepts behind it in many cases. Then one day you find a circuit you dont have a formula for and have to wonder what the output equation is. This is one of the reasons i like to suggest Nodal because it gives the user a sort of independence. It's true that circuit simulators are pretty good today, and they get better. One thing you cant see though is the underlying simplicity of some circuits that you'd never be able to guess just by looking at the circuit and/or running a simulation. So a good analysis method is nice to have on hand.

Nodal is not general? It's used in many theoretical works but it may not be apparent at first. It's also used in spice simulators.
You also have to have some experience applying it i guess.

If you want a better description of what it's used for, check out the cadence.com site "What is Nodal Analysis".

One interesting point is that almost every circuit that came up on this site since i joined some years back i have been able to apply my Nodal Analysis program to in order to find the results as well as to verify the program works ok with various circuits. The only time i dont use it is when i already know the solution or know the solution is rather simple. For example i did not use it today yet even though i analyzed an amplifier BP filter of a certain type, and that was because i knew the solution was a simple division (similar to an op amp circuit with an input R and and a feedback R).
Granted there is probably no one analysis method that can fit every single application under the sun, but i believe Nodal is so useful it's almost like it does.
Of course some circuit would not need Nodal because they are so very simple, such as a logic circuit with several gates of different types. That's not something you need Nodal for.

I am happy that you dont need Nodal Analysis but you could be missing some of the best stuff in electronic circuits. I take it you do not like math though so you probably wont like any method except maybe Ohms Law and the two K's.
 

dcbingaman

Joined Jun 30, 2021
610
Hi,

Oh yes i can see we approach things a bit differently.
What happens is a lot of theory depends on a full analysis of the topic at hand so i have used it so many times over the years i could never count the number. For example, when encountering a circuit i've never seen before. I've also been in the position where i had to prove a given new circuit idea would work, and that meant a really thorough analysis.

What happens if you dont have a good analysis method is you start to rely on formulas that other authors have developed, and i hate that because you cant see the underlying concepts behind it in many cases. Then one day you find a circuit you dont have a formula for and have to wonder what the output equation is. This is one of the reasons i like to suggest Nodal because it gives the user a sort of independence. It's true that circuit simulators are pretty good today, and they get better. One thing you cant see though is the underlying simplicity of some circuits that you'd never be able to guess just by looking at the circuit and/or running a simulation. So a good analysis method is nice to have on hand.

Nodal is not general? It's used in many theoretical works but it may not be apparent at first. It's also used in spice simulators.
You also have to have some experience applying it i guess.

If you want a better description of what it's used for, check out the cadence.com site "What is Nodal Analysis".

One interesting point is that almost every circuit that came up on this site since i joined some years back i have been able to apply my Nodal Analysis program to in order to find the results as well as to verify the program works ok with various circuits. The only time i dont use it is when i already know the solution or know the solution is rather simple. For example i did not use it today yet even though i analyzed an amplifier BP filter of a certain type, and that was because i knew the solution was a simple division (similar to an op amp circuit with an input R and and a feedback R).
Granted there is probably no one analysis method that can fit every single application under the sun, but i believe Nodal is so useful it's almost like it does.
Of course some circuit would not need Nodal because they are so very simple, such as a logic circuit with several gates of different types. That's not something you need Nodal for.

I am happy that you dont need Nodal Analysis but you could be missing some of the best stuff in electronic circuits. I take it you do not like math though so you probably wont like any method except maybe Ohms Law and the two K's.
Nodal analysis is a good tool but is seems to have it's place. There are other ways that might fit a given problem better, consider this:

1659548656154.png

I want to solve for Vout in terms of Vin1, Vin2, and Vin3. In my opinion the easiest way to do that (that I can practically do in my head) is Thevenin's theorem combined with superposition. Thevenize looking back from the right side of R4 you get:

1659548773773.png
Again from the right side of R7 and R8 you get:
1659548831050.png
And now I can clearly see the solution is just 5/11nths of the equation on the left of R11. I think it would be considerably more complicated had I used nodal analysis.
 
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