Best design to power multiple 9V dc guitar effects from one battery.

Thread Starter

markallen5

Joined Jun 28, 2023
5
Hi,
I'm new to this forum and came here hoping I could find the answer to my question .

I am not an electrically minded person, if that's the right expression and I hope I am on the correct forum, if not I apologise, but here goes anyway.
I am a musician and often busk , therefore I need to run my equipment from batteries.
My amplifiers are fine, Bose s1 pro's with their own lithium batteries built in .
I also use a 5AH sealed lead 12V battery and connect this to a 12V-9V-18W DC-DC convertor I bought cheaply on a well known online auction site.

This powers a guitar multi effects unit that doesn't have it's own battery and who's power supply's output is rated at 9V dc , 0.5A , 4.5W

I added an inline fuse but wasn't sure of the correct one to use.

I've used this for the last year and it's been fine but I'd like to expand my setup to power up to 5 9V DC devices, some of them would draw more current than the one I use at present and it would be nice to even consider powering a small portable projector , which might be 12V, for night time and even add a USB out for recharging .

As I'm not considering using any AC powered devices I didn't think about using an invertor as I imagined that would not be an efficient way to go, but as I said, I'm not knowledgeable about this but I'd like to keep both the size and cost down and for it to be the most efficient system there is.
I am intending to use a lithium battery to power all this for up to 5 hours , so I need to know how to work my sums out and buy the best quality components once I know what to use.

I haven't been able to find high AH 9V lithium batteries but 12V ones can be found in many different Amp hours , so could I use the same cheap 9V reducer or is there a better way and what battery capacity would I need . Is there an "all in one" power bank with the relevant outputs instead of rigging up all this from scratch ?

Anyway, that's about it and any help would be most welcome, Regards, Mark in Wales.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

schmitt trigger

Joined Jul 12, 2010
843
I know that for some guitar effects pedals, the battery’s positive is tied to common (The ring of the phone jack.) while others are negative.

Other than that, your scheme should work. Be aware though, that many of the cheap EBAY SMPS modules are very, very noisy. They do require significant post-filtering to be useable for audio work.
 

GutiarDjoe

Joined Mar 17, 2021
3
Hello,

Interesting project, one cable away is always a good news for a guitarist.

First you'll have to determine your power need. Make a list of your awesome pedal with the current draw for each one of them.

The step down converter seems to be a good choice if you find more interesting batteries in 12V. What do you know about your current step-down converter? Reference, max current provided...

It's Ok to put a fuse, you have to choose the right one, if it was ofr me i'll choose 1.5 or 2x the current needed.

A power button and a power on light is a good feature to add. Your pedal are draining current while there is a jack connected on the input.
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
9,502
I know that for some guitar effects pedals, the battery’s positive is tied to common (The ring of the phone jack.) while others are negative.

Other than that, your scheme should work. Be aware though, that many of the cheap EBAY SMPS modules are very, very noisy. They do require significant post-filtering to be useable for audio work.
ON early germanium "Fuzz face" effects, the battery positive is earth , and connects to the outside of the 2.1mm power plug.
On later effects, the battery negative is earth, but the 2.1mm power plug is still wired with the outside positive.
 

Thread Starter

markallen5

Joined Jun 28, 2023
5
I know that for some guitar effects pedals, the battery’s positive is tied to common (The ring of the phone jack.) while others are negative.

Other than that, your scheme should work. Be aware though, that many of the cheap EBAY SMPS modules are very, very noisy. They do require significant post-filtering to be useable for audio work.
Thank you for your reply.
What you said is just the sort of information that I need , Thanks .
My project is still evolving as I have a larger budget than I'm used to and am finding some serious bits of kit that I'd never have considered before. None of these are sold to run on batteries and all say to use their proprietary power supplies, So far they all seem to run on 9V DC with a centre negative but I haven't bought any yet to find out how much current they'll draw, if that's the correct term. I'm looking at something called the IK Tone X pedal and a Source audio collider Delay/ Reverb along with some smaller pedals and a Boss Rc-500 looper, which will run on AA batteries.
The only convertors I've seen are cheap Ebay ones and on a site, RS components , but I got lost trying to work out what I might need. I'd certainly invest more in a better quality unit if I knew what to look for and I haven't a clue how to post-filter anything .
Thanks again, Mark.
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
9,151
Don’t mix up Ah (amp hours), amps, or Watts. Many beginners do.

Ah is a battery rating that says the battery can supply that many amps for an hour. Or twice as many amps for 30 minutes. Etc…

And amps is current; Watts is power. To determine amps, divide watts by the voltage. Your DC-DC converter outputs 9V and 18W. That means it can supply up to 2A. If you were to add more pedals that in total draw more than 2A, the DC-DC converter will be overloaded and (depending on its design) shut down or fail dramatically.

This is why it’s important to analyze the maximum current required for all of your pedals. It will help you pick the right power supply and possibly DC-DC converter.
 

prepka

Joined Oct 5, 2020
29
Hi,
I'm new to this forum and came here hoping I could find the answer to my question .

I am not an electrically minded person, if that's the right expression and I hope I am on the correct forum, if not I apologise, but here goes anyway.
I am a musician and often busk , therefore I need to run my equipment from batteries.
My amplifiers are fine, Bose s1 pro's with their own lithium batteries built in .
I also use a 5AH sealed lead 12V battery and connect this to a 12V-9V-18W DC-DC convertor I bought cheaply on a well known online auction site.

This powers a guitar multi effects unit that doesn't have it's own battery and who's power supply's output is rated at 9V dc , 0.5A , 4.5W

I added an inline fuse but wasn't sure of the correct one to use.

I've used this for the last year and it's been fine but I'd like to expand my setup to power up to 5 9V DC devices, some of them would draw more current than the one I use at present and it would be nice to even consider powering a small portable projector , which might be 12V, for night time and even add a USB out for recharging .

As I'm not considering using any AC powered devices I didn't think about using an invertor as I imagined that would not be an efficient way to go, but as I said, I'm not knowledgeable about this but I'd like to keep both the size and cost down and for it to be the most efficient system there is.
I am intending to use a lithium battery to power all this for up to 5 hours , so I need to know how to work my sums out and buy the best quality components once I know what to use.

I haven't been able to find high AH 9V lithium batteries but 12V ones can be found in many different Amp hours , so could I use the same cheap 9V reducer or is there a better way and what battery capacity would I need . Is there an "all in one" power bank with the relevant outputs instead of rigging up all this from scratch ?

Anyway, that's about it and any help would be most welcome, Regards, Mark in Wales.
You should use one isolated converter for each device you power as not all
 

prepka

Joined Oct 5, 2020
29
You should use one isolated converter for each device you power as not all battery powered devices will have the same grounding.
The batteries in the device is usually isolated and floating, so you can safely plug it into your amp. You will need to maintain the same
isolation to each if using a common battery source. The 4.5W you are mentioning is likely an average power consumption and not a
peak value which may be a significantly higher value so having a slightly more powerful converter is not a bad thing. Be sure the converters
you purchase specifically state that they are isolates ones, otherwise they are not and you can damage the components and also your amp.
BTW, if you really want to run non-stop for 5 hours you may need to buy a truck battery or a deep-cycle marine battery
 

Thread Starter

markallen5

Joined Jun 28, 2023
5
Hello,

Interesting project, one cable away is always a good news for a guitarist.

First you'll have to determine your power need. Make a list of your awesome pedal with the current draw for each one of them.

The step down converter seems to be a good choice if you find more interesting batteries in 12V. What do you know about your current step-down converter? Reference, max current provided...

It's Ok to put a fuse, you have to choose the right one, if it was ofr me i'll choose 1.5 or 2x the current needed.

A power button and a power on light is a good feature to add. Your pedal are draining current while there is a jack connected on the input.
Hi, Thanks for the info,
I hadn't thought of the button and light. I'm still very much in the dark about all this, but trying to learn. Mark.
 

GutiarDjoe

Joined Mar 17, 2021
3
This product may cover your need for the pedals: https://www.thomann.de/gb/kse_falken_1.htm
There is certainly other products out there.

For the lighting I suggest you to use an indépendant solution. If you run out of light that's not a big issue. But if your pedal board shut down it's a real problem. Maybe you can buy one of those and continue with your 12v batterie for lightning.
 

Thread Starter

markallen5

Joined Jun 28, 2023
5
Hi,
Not been here for a while but I wanted to thank all those who replied and offered suggestions.
I wouldn't have found what to get without the replies, so Thanks.
I have bought a Cioks 4 power supply.
It is powered by either 9-24V DC
9-12V AC or
5V USB C , and has 4 outputs which can give up to 9-24V DC/ 660mA or 12V DC/500mA or 15V DC/400mA or 18V DC/330mA.
output power 24W max,
On the advice from Cioks, who responded to my email same day, I'm using a 20,000MaH power bank with USB C.
It's been powering up to 3 effects with 9V DC fine, came with lots of connecting leads and has made my setup so much easier and I suspect safer !
Thanks again, Mark.
 
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