Baseball Score indicator

Thread Starter

cjhaddenjr

Joined Jan 26, 2012
5
Baseball scoreboard help. Help me figure a way to use leds instead of cloths pins to indicate scores at my young grandkids ball games. I need a circuit that will turn on a led when a button, contact, is pressed and stays on until I press it the second time then the first will go off and the second will come on until I do it 20 times. I have a 2 button transmitter with the receiver having relays to act as the button so I can set in the stands and change score. Cant find anything out there to do this. Thanks
 

Attachments

Wolframore

Joined Jan 21, 2019
2,342
Personally I would use a microcontroller. Have you played with an Arduino? You can even output numbers to giant seven segment LEDs or something like that.
 

drc_567

Joined Dec 29, 2008
1,153
Re: previous comment on using an Arduino microcontroller ...
... As far as getting started, there is an introductory manual, which has a chapter on the topic of RF Links, where an operational distance of 100 meters is mentioned. As far as an output display is concerned, it may be possible to find LED numerals that would be sufficiently large enough for your application. ... Some basic LED information is discussed in a separate chapter.
... Or maybe set up an up/down counter, one for each team, with LEDs or lamps adjacent to particular numerals.
... Arduino Workshop ... John Boxall ... sec. ed.
 
Last edited:

Thread Starter

cjhaddenjr

Joined Jan 26, 2012
5
Re: previous comment on using an Arduino microcontroller ...
... As far as getting started, there is an introductory manual, which has a chapter on the topic of RF Links, where an operational distance of 100 meters is mentioned. As far as an output display is concerned, it may be possible to find LED numerals that would be sufficiently large enough for your application. ... Some basic LED information is discussed in a separate chapter.
... Or maybe set up an up/down counter, one for each team, with LEDs or lamps adjacent to particular numerals.
... Arduino Workshop ... John Boxall ... sec. ed.
I have looked at a lot of Arduino applications but none i saw had the 20 outputs I needed. Also I’m looking at powering up no more than 2 leds at a time to save battery power and size. Actually I bought two 00 to 99 counter display with a push button input but it will take a 6 AH battery to power it and I need small size, light weigh.
 

ElectricSpidey

Joined Dec 2, 2017
1,802
Without using a micro the first thing that comes to mind is a 21 stage Johnson ring counter, can be constructed using data flip flops or shift registers.

A micro would be the way to go, but just letting you know...there are other ways, that aren't all that complicated.

Actually a PSoC could do this project mostly with hardware and very little code, using multiplexers and counters.

But, of course everyone will push the Arduino.
 
Last edited:

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
6,264
I'm old school. I don't like to take one device and make it do hundreds of things. In this case I'd just use four up/down shift registers. Two for the left side and two for the right. Each time you push the "UP" button you move the register one position. But you need to debounce the button, otherwise one team could score 100 runs with the push of one button; and that'd be embarrassing to the designer/engineer. Youtube "Using shift registers" and see what comes up. Well, only if that's what you want to do. Me? I tend to stay away from micro's, but only because I'm an old and stubborn fart. And that's no lie.
 

ElectricSpidey

Joined Dec 2, 2017
1,802
Actually I was looking into the PSoC platform I use and the maximum numbers of channels for a digital MUX is 16 so the MUX and counter is out.

But, shift registers are available up to 32 bit, so it can still be done with hardware, in fact it is probably easier than with a MUX and counter.

Sorry about that little misinformation.
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
7,830
Eight 74HC595 shift registers will give you two sets of 32 LEDs with only a handful of micro pins. Add a couple pins more for two push buttons. And an Arduino Nano microprocessor. The ‘595 is used often by the Arduino community to increase its outputs. As such, there will be many examples of using this chip.
 

Wolframore

Joined Jan 21, 2019
2,342
Or you can charlieplex, you need 5 pins for 20 LEDS. 10 pins for 40.

the concept is simple, by placing LED in opposing directions between two pins, you can control which one is turned on by which pins are held high and low, you can add more LEDs to the same pins in opposing directions with New pins and add LED pairs between the new pins as well. Once we are past the original 2 you must control the impedance of some of the pins by changing them to inputs when appropriate.

best way to organize this is to by using DDR and PORT for all scenarios and calling them by name.
 
Last edited:

Thread Starter

cjhaddenjr

Joined Jan 26, 2012
5
Thanks to all for but I think I’ll try using some cd4094 counter shift registers to built this scoreboard due to low cost and and Im like Tonyr1084 being old school and old too to learn a lot of new stuff.
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
6,264
Saw a video a while ago. Wishing I could find it again. Found this one. Sort of what you're looking for I think:
Here's another:
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
6,264
In the case of the second video, suppose the score should read 6 runs and inadvertently your display is showing 7. Clear the display, then hold Data high and input a single Clock input. Then put in five more Clocks for a total of 6. Then hit Latch.
 
Top