Assumptions about wire splitter.

Thread Starter

Teljkon

Joined Jan 24, 2019
120
Hello,

I was looking at this product https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16812198015 contemplating how to best cut it for this project http://www.highonsolder.com/hardware/dual-boot-pc-w-toggle-switch/. Now I understand how it works in principle. However as i was thinking about cutting it I was wondering if I should just trim one jumper completely off at the female base. Or if I should cut them both 50/50 and then put the two lines off of the female together. Then it struck me that the PSU is delivering more power on demand to push two SSD's on the same line. If that is the case and the PSU can be assumed to push power as is necessary then why when i split the lines and put them back together am I not increasing amps or volts in the new single wire. The Ohm's went up in the circuit right so the PSU is going to respond with more what to solve that problem? The other two must change in the combined lead as they are going to be dumping it into one wire so the ohms drop isn't there a pickup in volts or amps.

I'm posting this in Physics because I would like an in-depth explainer. Its not home work but if the Mod want's to move it someplace else that is fine. The only satisfying answer I can come up with is the brain in the PSU. If I apply the same question to a dumb circuit with an infinit and constant supply that only adjusts to keep a constant voltage I get the same problem with the Pixies.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,704
Yes, it's not a physics question. The amount of resistance added in the wiring to extend and switch power to each drive power plug is negligible so don't worry about it.
 

Thread Starter

Teljkon

Joined Jan 24, 2019
120
Yes, it's not a physics question. The amount of resistance added in the wiring to extend and switch power to each drive power plug is negligible so don't worry about it.
Fair answer I guess if not very satisfying. The question made more simple is if I take three lengths of wire all one inch and drive two at five volts why when I dump it into the third wire does it not equal a greater voltage than five volts? Like I said this is not High level physics but seems if this spliter runs two SSD's why wouldn't it increase. Just feels like this thing is creating power from nothing for some reason. I was never a math person but I am still hoping some one can explain this to me.

If I take two pipes of the same length and both have 10 psi of pressure in them then I splice them together I don't get 10 PSI because of the new volume with electronics though it does not seem correct. In the pipes the volume is increased by one third the head pressure of 10 psi and 10 psi then drops and flow goes up until the two equalize once the volume is filled. In the water analogy what electrical variable is volume? From Ohms law it looks like Resistance but that dose not make any sense. When resistance goes up and the electron flow gets harder not easier. I have a visual mind and as hard as I try I can't visualize electron flow.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,704
Fair answer I guess if not very satisfying. The question made more simple is if I take three lengths of wire all one inch and drive two at five volts why when I dump it into the third wire does it not equal a greater voltage than five volts? Like I said this is not High level physics but seems if this spliter runs two SSD's why wouldn't it increase. Just feels like this thing is creating power from nothing for some reason. I was never a math person but I am still hoping some one can explain this to me.

If I take two pipes of the same length and both have 10 psi of pressure in them then I splice them together I don't get 10 PSI because of the new volume with electronics though it does not seem correct. In the pipes the volume is increased by one third the head pressure of 10 psi and 10 psi then drops and flow goes up until the two equalize once the volume is filled. In the water analogy what electrical variable is volume? From Ohms law it looks like Resistance but that dose not make any sense. When resistance goes up and the electron flow gets harder not easier. I have a visual mind and as hard as I try I can't visualize electron flow.
You are wasting time thinking about water analogies, electrons and electron flow while building the wrong mental visual image. Study simple circuits.
https://www.allaboutcircuits.com/textbook/direct-current/chpt-5/what-are-series-and-parallel-circuits/
 
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