Are we just living in a black hole??

Thread Starter

asdf arfw

Joined Sep 9, 2017
43
The scientists have found that our universe is expanding that likes how black holes gain their mass and expand and
the big bang theory it similarly like how black holes are born from the planet turn into a black hole by collapsed and boom! you got a black hole.
what do you think?
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
13,546
Would it matter to us if we are? Our scale to any possible universe sized black hole makes it impossible to know if we are living in a black hole that's in a black hole that's in a ...
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
34,835
Everything in a black hole is reduced to it constituent sub-atomic particles so no, I don't think we live in a black hole.
 

Wendy

Joined Mar 24, 2008
23,475
One theory states when the singularity punches a hole in space time It forms a white hole somewhere else where the raw materials from the singularity spill out. It would resemble a big bang.
 

MrAl

Joined Jun 17, 2014
11,693
The scientists have found that our universe is expanding that likes how black holes gain their mass and expand and
the big bang theory it similarly like how black holes are born from the planet turn into a black hole by collapsed and boom! you got a black hole.
what do you think?

Hello there,

I dont think we are living in a black hole mostly because of what is known about black holes in the current day and age. For one thing, we have this thing we call "time" and it is still allowing the universe to evolve.

ON the other hand, i might be willing to accept that we are living inside a HUGE shell, like a very giant egg shell, and the shell is dense or just thick enough to pull on everything in the universe with enough gravity to see the kind of motion we see with galaxies in our universe.
This kind of shell could be just outside our view which would make it very big, or it could be even bigger just more dense or thicker, and that would pull on everything in an outward motion. What it could be made of is of course also a question that probably cant be answered. Could it just be dark matter for example.
Could it even be made of a multitude of other universes that surround our own.
My reason for suggesting this is because the universe is expanding and in a way where we see everything accelerating, just like the way we see things fall to earth due to the earths gravity. Gravity from a giant shell would pull on everything and it would accelerate to faster and faster speeds which is what we see.

Once you start to think outside the box there are just so many possibilities but almost no way to prove any of them right now. We have a very very limited view from our tiny planet. That improves as time goes on, but there may be a limit on that too. We may never know everything. One thing is for sure though, right now we dont know everything about the universe.
 

Janis59

Joined Aug 21, 2017
1,863
I think it is certainly obvious we live in the black hole, because each salary day all my money are just sliding through the fingers like in the black hole, and day after the immortal existential question is always here again and again.
The assumption - the very centrum our system of things are based on ultra-heavy money-pile what creates the this monetary-gravitational collapse, plucking all our money out of hands....
 

MrAl

Joined Jun 17, 2014
11,693
I think it is certainly obvious we live in the black hole, because each salary day all my money are just sliding through the fingers like in the black hole, and day after the immortal existential question is always here again and again.
The assumption - the very centrum our system of things are based on ultra-heavy money-pile what creates the this monetary-gravitational collapse, plucking all our money out of hands....
Hi,

That's a funny way of looking at it.
From the standpoint of everyday personal economics :)
 

bogosort

Joined Sep 24, 2011
696
A thermodynamic argument that we're not living in a black hole:

By the Bekenstein bound, a black hole has the maximum entropy possible for a given volume (though, interestingly, the total entropy is proportional to its surface area). Since we can do work in our universe -- i.e., we have usable energy available -- we are clearly not living in a maximally entropic system. Therefore, we are not living in a black hole of constant size.

The black hole may be expanding, as we observe our universe to be expanding, in which case there is an entropy gradient between the black hole at its current size and some delta-t in the future. Theoretically, we could use this gradient to do work.

On the other hand, our universe expands adiabatically: the entropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation is the same now as it was at the big bang. This radiation is the universe's cosmological horizon; if it also represents the event horizon of a universe-engulfing black hole, then we'd be living in a volume whose surface area grows as its entropy remains constant. By the maximal entropy theorem, it cannot be a black hole.
 

Marley

Joined Apr 4, 2016
502
If the universe has sufficient mass to be closed - space-time curves around on itself - then we are living in a black hole - because nothing can get out. The universe will eventually stop expanding and collapse back in on itself.

But the current opinion is that the universe is not closed and will go on expanding forever.

Therefore we are not in a black hole.
 

joeyd999

Joined Jun 6, 2011
5,400
If the universe has sufficient mass to be closed - space-time curves around on itself - then we are living in a black hole - because nothing can get out. The universe will eventually stop expanding and collapse back in on itself.

But the current opinion is that the universe is not closed and will go on expanding forever.

Therefore we are not in a black hole.
Unless the expansion of our "black hole universe" is caused by the continual in-fall of matter/energy from outside our black hole (exceeding the Hawking radiation leaving our black hole). This could provide a great explanation for the smoothness of the background radiation and conveniently eliminates the need for an inflationary period at the beginning of the universe.

To me, the biggest problem is "turtles all the way down".
 

joeyd999

Joined Jun 6, 2011
5,400
Unless the expansion of our "black hole universe" is caused by the continual in-fall of matter/energy from outside our black hole (exceeding the Hawking radiation leaving our black hole). This could provide a great explanation for the smoothness of the background radiation and conveniently eliminates the need for an inflationary period at the beginning of the universe.

To me, the biggest problem is "turtles all the way down".
Oh...it also conveniently eliminates the need for dark matter.
 

cmartinez

Joined Jan 17, 2007
8,284
It's an anti-matter black hole :).
Not really... a white hole is the hypothetical "exit output" of a black hole. It's an old theory that said that all the mass that fell into a black hole later sprouted at another distant point in the universe. Hardly any scientist takes that theory seriously anymore.
 
Top