About to graduate, but I don't feel ready. Advice?

Thread Starter

Helpless1234

Joined Oct 8, 2017
4
Hello,
I am about to graduate with a degree in Electrical Engineering in the fall of 2018. However, I just do not feel prepared. I do not think I would feel confident pulling any problem from any of my classes, and easily solve them.
I was wondering if anyone had books that cover many of the most of the crucial ideas? I want to briefly touch many of the bigger topics, without wasting 3 months just on circuits, so, ideally, it would be broad, but go over many important topics.
I would really like to find some good ones that are used in the power systems( generators, protective relays, power distribution, etc.), analyzing circuits, op-amps, etc.
Any book recommendations? Video series recommendations? Anything is helpful, but I just wanted some extra research, so I can be ready for anything I could be hit with during an interview.

Thank you!
 

Thread Starter

Helpless1234

Joined Oct 8, 2017
4
Mostly the things that I have mentioned. I am just beginning the classes geared towards the actual power systems, so most of the other ones have been geared towards circuits, which I do not believe I could solve now. I'm just looking for books that may run parallel with the general material that the typical university teaches. Or something that they do not teach, but will be in the real world. Mainly just want to be ready for any basic question that I could be asked during an interview. And I attend Louisiana State University.

And It's been over the span of 5 years, because I was taking EE and CM classes at the same time to help decide what I wanted, and I have a Business Management minor. There are a bunch of classes bunched in there.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

KL7AJ

Joined Nov 4, 2008
2,225
Hello,
I am about to graduate with a degree in Electrical Engineering in the fall of 2018. However, I just do not feel prepared. I do not think I would feel confident pulling any problem from any of my classes, and easily solve them.
I was wondering if anyone had books that cover many of the most of the crucial ideas? I want to briefly touch many of the bigger topics, without wasting 3 months just on circuits, so, ideally, it would be broad, but go over many important topics.
I would really like to find some good ones that are used in the power systems( generators, protective relays, power distribution, etc.), analyzing circuits, op-amps, etc.
Any book recommendations? Video series recommendations? Anything is helpful, but I just wanted some extra research, so I can be ready for anything I could be hit with during an interview.

Thank you!
Become an apprentice to an actual working engineer! There is NO better way to become confident.
 

DickCappels

Joined Aug 21, 2008
6,386
An excellent way into the real world of electronics where you can get your hands dirty is with an internship program. If your school has one, jump on it. Good interns often get job offers as well are real world experience and if lucky, mentoring.
 

Gibson486

Joined Jul 20, 2012
327
At least you admit it! Lots of new grads think that (me included) once you get the degree, you will know what you need to know. You can open as many books and watch as many youtube lectures as you'd like, but nothing will really sink in until you actually do it. If you are lucky, you will get a job right out schhol. Until you actually do it and make mistakes, you will simply forget what you learn. If you do not get a job right out of college, then do some side projects and try to actually finish it. It does not matter if it is a very simple project because you have to start somewhere. When I look for new grads to work with, I look for people who are engaged in what they do. They go out of there way to learn something and they try to put it to practice. I do not really care if it was successful, but I will check to see what you got out of it.
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
25,760
Mostly the things that I have mentioned. I am just beginning the classes geared towards the actual power systems, so most of the other ones have been geared towards circuits, which I do not believe I could solve now.
Sounds like you have dug yourself a pretty deep hole -- and it's likely only going to get deeper. How well prepared do you think you are to do well in "the classes geared towards the actual power systems" if you don't believe you can solve basic circuit problems? Remember, power systems ARE circuits!

Mainly just want to be ready for any basic question that I could be asked during an interview.
Then you need to get comfortable solving those basic circuit problems. Many technical interviews will start with a few of those and if you can't solve them then they will wish you well and send you on your way.

Pull out the exams for all of your technical courses and work them from scratch. Then dig into the books until you know that you can solve each one of them handily.
 

BR-549

Joined Sep 22, 2013
4,938
Why did you want to be an EE? What part of EE do you like? Are you a geek? Are you obsessive?

As a general rule, EEs, usually, are not normal people. Ask anybody.

Send out an empty resume saying that you just graduated and in-experienced. Go to the largest companies in the country first.

Done. There will be one person in your department that everyone goes to with problems. Work for and learn from that person.

And if your not a geek or tech type........you could sell for or represent a firm with your minor.

How can you lose?
 

joeyd999

Joined Jun 6, 2011
4,394
Hello,
I am about to graduate with a degree in Electrical Engineering in the fall of 2018. However, I just do not feel prepared. I do not think I would feel confident pulling any problem from any of my classes, and easily solve them.
I was wondering if anyone had books that cover many of the most of the crucial ideas? I want to briefly touch many of the bigger topics, without wasting 3 months just on circuits, so, ideally, it would be broad, but go over many important topics.
I would really like to find some good ones that are used in the power systems( generators, protective relays, power distribution, etc.), analyzing circuits, op-amps, etc.
Any book recommendations? Video series recommendations? Anything is helpful, but I just wanted some extra research, so I can be ready for anything I could be hit with during an interview.

Thank you!
Be the ball...

 
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