10.8v coverted to 6v

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Tyronebeginner, May 3, 2017.

  1. Tyronebeginner

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 3, 2017
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    Im a beginner at electronics and would like to know how to convert 10.8v 1.5am down to 6v keeping the amps the same, it is from a lithium ion battery if that makes any difference? Any help would be appreciated, thanks.
     
  2. dl324

    AAC Fanatic!

    Mar 30, 2015
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    Welcome to AAC!

    Voltage regulator. Use a switching regulator if you're concerned about dissipating ~40% of the power in the regulator.
     
  3. Tyronebeginner

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 3, 2017
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    Is there any way you could dumb this down for me at all please? As i am a beginner at this and don't really know technical terms.
     
  4. dl324

    AAC Fanatic!

    Mar 30, 2015
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    Don't know of any fixed 6V regulators off hand, but you could use a 5V regulator with a diode in the ground connection to get 5.7V. If you need something more accurate, you can use better control or an LM317.

    EDIT: They do make 6V regulators; LM7806.

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    Last edited: May 3, 2017
  5. tcmtech

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    Nov 4, 2013
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    It depends on the current you need and for how long plus what amount of inefficiency you can live with.

    At 1.5 amps if it's just for a short duration and a fairly high power loss while in operation is acceptable a simple linear regulator IC as others mentioned would work fine.

    However if it needs to run for extended amounts of time where overall long term highest possible efficiency is required a more complex switch mode type buck converter circuit would be better.
     
  6. Tyronebeginner

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 3, 2017
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    Thanks for the replies and it will sound like a pointless or rediculous project to most but i have an old cordless dwalt drill that is knackered due to the motor not working and the idea is to use the + and - from the motor to put directly into a vapor pen chip with the screen and all compenents, then out to the 510 connection, it is more for a show peice than anything but i still want to make it safe. Tcmtech in reply i would assume that it would be a high drain for short periods of time i just need to get the voltage down to 6v to run it correctly. Can you suggest a specific component?
     
  7. tcmtech

    Distinguished Member

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    No clue what a vapor pen or a 510 connection is. :confused:
     
    #12 likes this.
  8. Tyronebeginner

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 3, 2017
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    Oh right well im not exactly sure hiw it works but the power outputted from the vapor pen is read as watts, it is then transferred out via the 510 connectionin (which is essentially just a female screw-in conection with positive on the outside and negative through the center) to the atomizer where it heats up metal coils to vaporize liquid, in short there used to help people quit smoking but is also a bit of a hobby for a lot of people.
     
  9. #12

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  10. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    Are you looking to build a circuit from basic components, or just convert power from the 10.8 V batteries to the 6 V that you need for your pen? If the latter, then you might just get a pre-built and ready-to-use DC-DC converter module. They come in all kinds of shapes, sizes, features, and prices. In the hobby world they are often called "battery eliminators" because they are used to get the different voltages needed from a single battery instead of multiple batteries.

    Here's one I found real quick that will probably work fine for you and is under $15.

    https://www.motionrc.com/collections/battery-eliminator-circuits/products/ztw-10a-bec-ubec
     
  11. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Half of this Thread is involved with guessing how accurate you need your power supply voltage. That is what caused the complicated circuits to be offered. The natural voltage changes of a battery are much more significant than the natural error of a voltage regulator chip. A resistor will do the job cheap and simple.
     
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