Why grass?

Thread Starter

strantor

Joined Oct 3, 2010
6,342
Society demands that everyone who has a square foot or more of suburban real estate cultivate a nonflowering, nonedible invasive crop on it. Why? Who's bright idea was that, and why did everybody decide to go along with it? Why couldn't it be strawberries, or bluebonnets? Something that is beneficial & edible, or at least beautiful?

If I were to till up my front lawn and plant an impassable thicket of 10' high sunflowers, my neighbors would be outraged. Why? They're beautiful, edible, I wouldn't have to mow, they provide privacy, they're good for the land, the list of reasons goes on. But no, I'm expected to pay a water bill so I can keep this stupid grass green in the heat of summer, and then because I water it so much it grows like cancer and I have continuously mow it, which further requires me to buy a lawnmower, edger, gasoline, etc and I have to pay to have the clippings hauled off. It's an utter folly.

[/rant]
 

maxpower097

Joined Feb 20, 2009
816
Were allowed to do that here. Many yards in FL are plain jungles. Your in the south you'll appreciate this. Up north in the winter. The lawns all die and they litterally spray paint them green and have companies that do it. Its the dumbest thing you've ever seen. All the trees are bare, all the lawns are brown then you'll run into a couple houses that have this stupid bright green lawns. I laughed so hard the first time I saw that.
 

justtrying

Joined Mar 9, 2011
439
In BC some people have gardens around their houses. It has been becoming more and more popular. Often see lettuce, cabbage, and other edible green stuff.

I never understood "the lawn" to me it is a sign of conformity?
 

Wendy

Joined Mar 24, 2008
23,082
I do not water my grass. I am aware of no ordinances that require it, quite the contrary nowdays. Neighborhood associations my require it, but I don't belong to one and never will.

There is a state law that does not allow you to cut bluebonnets. Ever consider growing those in your lawn?
 

VoodooMojo

Joined Nov 28, 2009
505
I wish they would let me grow grass.
the Japanese Maple has a strangely similiar shape.
They did let me plant a row of those.
Bright red though.
 

Sparky49

Joined Jul 16, 2011
833
Grass is brilliant.

When uniform and evenly cut.

Watch those edges - the should be cut clean. No overhang.

Thankyou.
 

HarveyH42

Joined Jul 22, 2007
426
There are a lot of benefits of having grass. Think mostly because it's low maintenance, fast growing. The roots keep your soil in place, rather than being rinsed away when it rains. It doesn't bear fruit, when clipped regular, which doesn't harm the plant. This also discourages pests and vermin. Grass can be walked on, without harm. Pets can use it as a toilet, which wouldn't be appealing if you are planning on eating it. Most food plants, need to be replanted each year, grass doesn't usually die off, but goes dormant.

Don't think there is any law compelling anyone to plant or maintain grass, other than keeping it cut, to control pests and vermin. If you live under a Homeowner's Association, you agreed to pay them, to tell you what you can or cannot do. You supposedly have the right to change those rules. Here in Florida, the state ruled that residents can rip up the grass, and plant drought tolerant native plants, to conserve water, HOA can't rule against, but they can get you in other ways...
 

Thread Starter

strantor

Joined Oct 3, 2010
6,342
HOA can't rule against, but they can get you in other ways...
Exactly... You can beat the rap, but you won't beat the ride.

You thumb your nose at these people and I swear they will send a sentry to watch your house and send you nasty letters for every little thing.

I only rent, so I never signed a HOA agreement, but my landlord did. So anytime they get a nasty letter, I get a nasty phone call. Last year a lot of the grass died because I didn't water it enough. Call me silly, but I don't see the point in driving MY water bill up to keep my landlord's lawn looking pristine when, I wouldn't even water it if it were MY lawn. I'm glad I went through this renting before I decided to buy a house. I already didn't want to live in the city, but now my resolve is strengthened. I will never buy anything but rural land.
 

Wendy

Joined Mar 24, 2008
23,082
HOA's aren't everywhere. They aren't even a majority. Anyone who voluntarily forms one in their neighborhood deserves what they get.

To me watering grass makes very little sense, it hibernates well, even in summer. Watering the foundation is a different issue, this is a common mistake many people make.
 

shortbus

Joined Sep 30, 2009
9,764
My neighbors hate it that I don't water my grass, and when theirs is drying out in the summer mine is still green. By watering the grass it becomes dependent on it. Mine grows deeper roots to reach the moisture while theirs has shallow roots that dry out.

I also don't have the "chemlawn" like they do. And mines always green.
 

t06afre

Joined May 11, 2009
5,934
My neighbors hate it that I don't water my grass, and when theirs is drying out in the summer mine is still green. By watering the grass it becomes dependent on it. Mine grows deeper roots to reach the moisture while theirs has shallow roots that dry out.

I also don't have the "chemlawn" like they do. And mines always green.
You can water the grass. But the error is that people do not water enough to give the lawn/plants a good soak. The roots will not go deep to find water. I many areas water is a commodity in short supply. And should be used with more care than watering lawns. Which is kind of squandering. I live in an area that has good cool drinking water directly from the tap. It taste good to. But many people are not so lucky.
 

Adjuster

Joined Dec 26, 2010
2,148
In many regions of my country there there is not much point in associations imposing requirements to water lawns, because in times of drought (as at present) Councils declare so-called hose-pipe bans, making it illegal to use piped mains water to do things like water gardens or wash cars.

NB You might be surprised to note that I live in London, capital of that well-known Green and Pleasant Land called England, so renowned for its eternal downpours. Actually, we have just endured a typically wet and windy Bank Holiday Weekend here in London, but nevertheless this year seems to be set up for serious water-shortages, with talk of water rationing and interruptions to public supplies - what gives here???
 

maxpower097

Joined Feb 20, 2009
816
It was probably a law set into place many places because of the depression that caused the dust bowl. When the depression hit in the 30's people abandoned farmland and never planted crops for a couple seasons. The realized like was mentioned above with no "cover crop" that the top soil litterally blew away into a huge dust bowl. You can see video's of it on youtube. This made it hard to recover the farmland when the economy came back. Other then the nazi HOA, laws that cities and states have about grass would be due to this and errosion mainly into rivers.
 

Sparky49

Joined Jul 16, 2011
833
Don't worry chaps, Scotland will come to the rescue. Piping water down south. Dry periods come and go. Remember, east Anglia is one of the driest places in the world, yet it has great agriculture.

My aren't we all clever. No doomsday for some time yet lol.
 
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