Why are measurents of primary and secondary voltages different to calculations?

Thread Starter

gbtbtbt

Joined Mar 18, 2020
72
Thank you. Also is it possible to calculate a negative voltage, but not be measure a negative quantity on the voltmeter? If so, how is it possible?
 

DickCappels

Joined Aug 21, 2008
8,806
Thank you. Also is it possible to calculate a negative voltage, but not be measure a negative quantity on the voltmeter? If so, how is it possible?
I am puzzled. What does "a negative quantity on a voltmeter" mean in a discussion of a circuit that only contains AC?
 

Alec_t

Joined Sep 17, 2013
12,887
Regardless of the buck/boost arrangement I am somewaht surprised and concerned at the unnecessarily high voltages being used for this academic exercise :eek:. Take care.
Are you sure you have your meter set to read AC volts?
 
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Thread Starter

gbtbtbt

Joined Mar 18, 2020
72
are power supply was at most 60 volts. I found out that you cannot measure negative polarity in a multimeter, which meant it was a trick question. I don't think you can ever measure a negative value for a buck voltage transformer. The secondary voltage can be as low as 0.01 mathematically speaking, but never zero, as you cant still get a turns ratio.
 
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