What is the specific name for this IC package?

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mwalden824

Joined Mar 6, 2011
51
It's the MPU-9150 by InvenSense which is a 9 DOF gyro, accelerometer, and magnetometer. It is 4 mm wide, 4 mm long, and 1 mm in height. There are no actual pins that stick out anyway. The "pins" are under the package around the outer perimeter if you look at the bottom of the IC with 6 equally spaced "pins" on each of the 4 sides totaling 24.

The reason I ask is I am wondering if there is some sort of socket I can order that will make the chip fit into a breadboard or really any type of socket that will make it a little bigger and easier to work with. There is no way I could solder wire directly to the chip I don't think. The damn thing is way too small.

Does anyone have any idea about how I could do this? Find a socket? or solder it? or find or design a breakout board and order it then re-flow it on it?

I have attached a picture of the package dimensions. The data sheet doesn't seem to give a specific name for this package but I think it may be called LGA-24? Am I right?
 

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MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
19,427
This is a LGA-24 package (Lead Grid Array), also similar to MLF and QFN.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quad-flat_no-leads_package

You can solder this by hand by VERY CAREFULLY soldering the connections at edges of the package.
Or you can heat the board and chip in a temperature controlled oven or hot air gun.

There are a number of web sites with instructions. Search for How to solder LGA

http://amarkham.com/?p=236
 

ErnieM

Joined Apr 24, 2011
8,007
Ouch, that is one of the hardest SMD parts to solder. A hot air gun is best but with the some adapter boards you can manage with just a very small conventional tip... or a larger tip if you remove the inevitable solder shorts (solder wick is what I use for that).

This adapter is good for several size parts, you center the part and just don't use the extra pads.



I get these from here on EBay.

BTW, if you have some fine solid bus wire (mine is 32 AWG) you can hald solder this: helps to start by gluing the chip down, then you can tack a wire on each pad, and bring it out and solder that end down too.
 
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takao21203

Joined Apr 28, 2012
3,696
They are NOT meant to be for manual unaided soldering.

You need to reflow them.

Tagging wires is a practice I tried a few times and then abandoned it.

The adapter shown is for TQFP, not for leadless.
 

ErnieM

Joined Apr 24, 2011
8,007
Hey, I've paid more, but seeing that price this morn surprised me too, I started up with Digole as they were 1/10th the price of others. ETTeam does some good adapters too, but single sided: Digole's has another pattern on the back side.

And of course, you have to play the cost per unit vs the shipping costs. Single piece quantities it's much cheaper for me to get the more expensive board.

And without a scaled drawing I'd have to go with the Digole board as I don't worry the pads would not project under the QFN package. Plus I have no worries about hand soldering this with a fine tip iron: just heat the outside edge of the pad and the solder should flow right under the part.
 

takao21203

Joined Apr 28, 2012
3,696
Well if it works out then good. I had bad solder flux one time especially ruining fine tips- as a result, I learned how to use broad tips.
 

panic mode

Joined Oct 10, 2011
1,783
I agree that ETT breakout boards are not gold plated but since this is meant for prototyping it is good that they are cheap. they do work fine and i had no issues soldering them (and i did so by hand). if there is something left to be desired, it is that they are not as flexible as the one ErnieM referenced ("one size fits all").
 

thatoneguy

Joined Feb 19, 2009
6,359
The Digole boards tend to handle more than one package, e.g. similar pin pitch/leadless or not. The ETT seem to have similar, but single sided and not quite as "universal".

I can see good arguments for either. Though I will state that the chip in the OP is one step down from BGA in difficulty to solder perfectly.
 

takao21203

Joined Apr 28, 2012
3,696
The Digole boards tend to handle more than one package, e.g. similar pin pitch/leadless or not. The ETT seem to have similar, but single sided and not quite as "universal".

I can see good arguments for either. Though I will state that the chip in the OP is one step down from BGA in difficulty to solder perfectly.
Some of these ETT boards are double side.

I have cheap black TQFP44 adapters here, which are a bit bad as the traces are not visible properly when there are flux residues. Always need a blank one for reference.

they are also good- they can be broken easily because it is not a strong glass fiber epoxy, only some kind of weaker, thinner making.

And they even have TQFP32 (or is it LQFP32 actually).

Futurlec takes a while to ship, so it is no point to place small orders. I always wait until it piles up to about 70 to 100 dollars. Or at least 50 dollar.
 
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