What is the name and partnumber of this type of switch?

Thread Starter

ArthurFrancisco

Joined Jul 12, 2018
2
For a project I'm doing, I need a key with three positions. However, in order to avoid overvoltages, it can not be open when switching from one pole to another. For example, to switch from pole 1 to pole 2, it must first connect to 2 without leaving 1 and then disconnect from 1 only 2.

Does anyone know the name of this type of key? I've read something about it in a book, but I have no details about it.
 

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ebp

Joined Feb 8, 2018
2,332
That type of operation is normally called "shorting" or "make-before-break." I have no idea if it is something that is easy to find in a key-operated switch. It is reasonably common for conventional rotary switches. Some manufactures will offer a particular model of switch with either that operation mode or "non-shorting"/"break-before-make" but for many only the non-shorting type is available.
 

Thread Starter

ArthurFrancisco

Joined Jul 12, 2018
2
That type of operation is normally called "shorting" or "make-before-break." I have no idea if it is something that is easy to find in a key-operated switch. It is reasonably common for conventional rotary switches. Some manufactures will offer a particular model of switch with either that operation mode or "non-shorting"/"break-before-make" but for many only the non-shorting type is available.
I'm just thinking of using a rotary switch.
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
5,646
For a project I'm doing, I need a key with three positions. However, in order to avoid overvoltages, it can not be open when switching from one pole to another. For example, to switch from pole 1 to pole 2, it must first connect to 2 without leaving 1 and then disconnect from 1 only 2.

Does anyone know the name of this type of key? I've read something about it in a book, but I have no details about it.
As mentioned what you want is commonly called a make before break type switch which come in several flavors with rotary type likely the most common and popular. You may wish to look at the Grayhill 5000 Series. Like Max I used Grayhill in many of my designs. There are dozens of other manufacturers as well.

What you don't mention is the switching current and voltage? In a design world switches become a small world unto themselves. Load current aside things like switching current, switching voltage and a host of other mechanical and electrical specifications come into play.

Ron
 

-live wire-

Joined Dec 22, 2017
912
What is the source of these overvoltages? Can you share a circuit? I think suppressing overvoltages is far easier than finding exotic switches.
 
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